Peter-Huber-Cropped

Noted author, attorney Peter Huber spoke at Clemson April 12

Rick Uhlmann, College of Business and Behavioral Science March 22, 2016 Peter Huber, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute for More »

Hudson.Talk.TWH.12.8.15

A Century of Spectrum Overregulation and the Quest to Liberate Wireless Technologies

via Hudson Institute With the FCC’s relentless drive to regulate new technologies, a look back at the history of the More »

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Noted author, attorney Peter Huber spoke at Clemson April 12

Peter-Huber-Cropped

Rick Uhlmann, College of Business and Behavioral Science

March 22, 2016

Peter Huber, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research and prominent Washington, D.C. attorney, spoke at Clemson University on April 12, 5-6:30 p.m., in 100 Hardin Hall as part of the Clemson Information Economy Project.

An author of several books, Huber spoke on his latest title, “The Cure in the Code: How 20th Century Law is Undermining 21st Century Medicine.” The discussion focused on Huber’s argument that obsolete policies and government regulation are impeding growth of DNA-focused medical treatments.

Huber cites molecular medicine advances that are producing “designer drugs,” which offer cures customized to each patient. Yet, such therapies are routinely blocked because of new-drug approval restrictions imposed by the Food and Drug Administration. Huber argues progress will be thwarted until new rules are crafted that will allow for scientific breakthroughs now possible.

Before joining the Manhattan Institute, where he writes on drug development, energy, technology, and the law, Huber was an associate professor at MIT. He clerked on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals for Ruth Bader Ginsburg and on the U.S. Supreme Court for Sandra Day O’Connor. Huber has a J.D. from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from MIT.

The Information Economy Project supports academic research, policy analysis, and popular commentary using economic theory and empirical methods to evaluate the challenges facing policy makers, judges and entrepreneurs.

For more information on the April 12 lecture, contact Kaitlin Matheson kmathes@g.clemson.edu.

Click here to watch Huber’s lecture.

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When the government mistrusts markets: Tribune Publishing’s blocked bid for the O.C. Register

This Dec. 27, 2012 file photo shows the newsroom of the Orange County Register in Santa Ana, Calif. (Jae C. Hong, AP)

 

via Chicago Tribune

When we at the Tribune have a conflict of interest, you as our readers should know about it. Today we confess not only a conflict, but a long-standing bias: First, our corporate parent, Tribune Publishing, is a player in the news story that prompts us to once again scratch a chronic itch. Second, through its 169 years, the Tribune has noisily championed robust competition among all the companies, individuals and other entities that publish news and commentary. You think your website, your station, your newspaper, can cover Chicago better than we do? Game on.

Decade after decade, though, federal regulators have fretted that in a free marketplace, an ever-smaller number of media voices would somehow monopolize the flow of information to consumers. And, decade after decade, we’ve criticized the regulators’ refusal to acknowledge and applaud the individual judgments that millions of news consumers exercise every day. Example: We could trip a horse with our stack of editorials challenging Washington’s rules about who should or shouldn’t own a newspaper and a TV station in the same metropolitan market.

While we and the regulators were busy quarreling, new technologies and competitive ambitions rendered the debate obsolete — or so we thought. The abundance of news and commentary now available on the Internet, in print, via social media and over cable, TV and radio outlets makes following the news resemble drinking from a water cannon.

So imagine our surprise when the U.S. Department of Justice sued to stop a California company from selling two newspapers to the highest bidder — yes, Tribune Publishing of Chicago. The seller, Freedom Communications, already had shut down its newspapers in Los Angeles and Long Beach, and in November had filed for bankruptcy after losing more than $40 million over two years. At an auction last week, Freedom accepted Tribune Publishing’s $56 million cash bid for the Orange County Register and Riverside Press-Enterprise.

Search Engine Optimization: What Drives Organic Traffic to Retail Sites?

(Dr. Babur De Los Santos with Michael R. Baye and Matthijs R. Wildenbeest, Journal of Economics &

Management Strategy, forthcoming)

 

The lion’s share of retail traffic through search engines originates from organic (natural) rather than sponsored (paid) links. We use a dataset constructed from over 12,000 search terms and 2 million users to identify drivers of the organic clicks that the top 759 retailers received from search engines in August 2012. Our results are potentially important for search engine optimization (SEO). We find that a retailer’s investments in factors such as the quality and brand awareness of its site increases organic clicks through both a direct and an indirect effect. The direct effectstems purely from consumer behavior: The greater the brand equity of an online retailer, the greater the number of consumers who click its link rather than a competitor in the list of organic results. The indirect effect stems from our finding that search engines tend to place better-branded sites in better positions, which results in additional clicks since consumers tend to click links in more favorable positions. We also find that consumers who are older, wealthier, conduct searches from work, use fewer words or include a brand name product in their search are more likely to click a retailer’s organic link following a product search. Finally, the brand equity of a retail site appears to be especially important in attracting organic traffic from individuals with higher incomes. The beneficial direct and indirect effects of an online retailer’s brand equity on organic clicks, coupled with the spillover effects on traffic through other online and traditional channels, leads us to conclude that investments in the quality and brand awareness of a site should be included as part of an SEO strategy.

Download This Paper

A Century of Spectrum Overregulation and the Quest to Liberate Wireless Technologies

Hudson.Talk.TWH.12.8.15

via Hudson Institute

With the FCC’s relentless drive to regulate new technologies, a look back at the history of the federal government’s spectrum regulation can shed light on how to encourage innovation and competition in the wireless industry.

On Wednesday, December 9th, Professor Thomas Hazlett discussed his forthcoming book, The Political Spectrum: From Marconi to the iPhone, The Quest to Liberate Wireless Technologies of Freedom, in which he offers a revealing account of regulators’ suppression of competition and innovation over the past century, debunks the popular myth that regulators rescued the airwaves from chaos, and argues that the wireless market’s full potential can only be unleashed through spectrum deregulation.

Thomas Hazlett holds the H.H. Macaulay Endowed Chair in Economics at Clemson University, where he also serves as Director of the Information Economy Project. Professor Hazlett previously served as Chief Economist of the Federal Communications Commission. Professor Hazlett’s widely published research focuses on regulation of telecommunications and the information sector. Professor Hazlett’s forthcoming book, The Political Spectrum: From Marconi to the iPhone, The Quest to Liberate Wireless Technologies of Freedom, will be published in the spring of 2016 by Yale University Press. Hudson Institute Senior Fellow and former FCC Commissioner Harold Furchtgott-Roth moderated the event.

Click here to download Dr. Hazlett’s slides.

Economics-Free’ Obamanet The White House and FCC acted on pure ideology. Cost-benefit analysis? What’s that?

President Obama with Tom Wheeler, his then-nominee to head the Federal Communications Commission, May 1, 2013.

President Obama with Tom Wheeler, his then-nominee to head the Federal Communications Commission, May 1, 2013.

Feb. 1, 2016

A Technology Policy Institute conference last month turned into something of a roast. Economist Tom Hazlett proposed a mischievous toast to “our friend, former FCC chief economist Tim Brennan, who wrote every word” of the Federal Communications Commission’s new regulations over the Internet. Mr. Brennan denied any involvement with the heavy-handed rules: “Nothing the FCC says necessarily represents the views of Tim Brennan or his staff.” He called the rules “an economics-free zone.”