POLITICO Technology Reporter Margaret McGill (left) is joined by Paula Boyd,
Senior Director of Government Affairs and Policy, Microsoft (second from left) Harold Feld, Senior Vice President, Public Knowledge (third from left) Tom Hazlett, Hugh H. Macaulay Endowed Professor of Economics, Clemson University; former Chief Economist, Federal Communications Commission; author, "The Political Spectrum"
(second from right and David Strickland, Partner, Venable LLP; former Administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (right) during the POLITICO panel discussion "Spectrum, Innovation and Infrastructure in the Trump Era" at the Willard InterContinental Hotel in Washington, DC, Thursday, June 15, 2017. (Photo by Rod Lamkey Jr.)

Thomas Hazlett participated in a debate held by POLITICO in Washington DC

Spectrum, Innovation and Infrastructure in the Trump Era – Thursday June 15, 2017   Watch the Video Facebook: POLITICO Live’s Facebook Page has More »

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Regulatory expert Robert Crandall spoke at Clemson Oct. 31

Rick Uhlmann, College of Business October 21, 2016 Deregulation would unleash efficiencies and enhance U.S. spending and productivity growth, according More »

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A Century of Spectrum Overregulation and the Quest to Liberate Wireless Technologies

via Hudson Institute With the FCC’s relentless drive to regulate new technologies, a look back at the history of the More »

Tullock Lecture on October 30th

PowerPoint Presentation

Thomas Hazlett, Sinclair and ‘Big Media’: The Outrage that Caused the Outrage, The Hill

thehillSinclair and ‘Big Media’: The outrage that caused the outrage

Wall Street Journal review of “The Political Spectrum.”

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Unlocking the Airwaves

In regulating radio, the FCC enacted rules nominally in the public interest, but which actually enriched specific interest groups. Gregory L. Rosston reviews ‘The Political Spectrum’ by Thomas Winslow Hazlett.

Americans enjoy unprecedented choice in communications technology. We have millions of options for digital entertainment, keep a universe of information in our back pockets and can call nearly anywhere on earth for a pittance. To most consumers, government seems a minor player. So what’s wrong with communications regulation?

As Thomas Hazlett explains in “The Political Spectrum,” there are many problems, and they have enormous consequences. Economic activity is increasingly conducted wirelessly, under a regulatory regime…

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