POLITICO Technology Reporter Margaret McGill (left) is joined by Paula Boyd,
Senior Director of Government Affairs and Policy, Microsoft (second from left) Harold Feld, Senior Vice President, Public Knowledge (third from left) Tom Hazlett, Hugh H. Macaulay Endowed Professor of Economics, Clemson University; former Chief Economist, Federal Communications Commission; author, "The Political Spectrum"
(second from right and David Strickland, Partner, Venable LLP; former Administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (right) during the POLITICO panel discussion "Spectrum, Innovation and Infrastructure in the Trump Era" at the Willard InterContinental Hotel in Washington, DC, Thursday, June 15, 2017. (Photo by Rod Lamkey Jr.)

Thomas Hazlett participated in a debate held by POLITICO in Washington DC

Spectrum, Innovation and Infrastructure in the Trump Era – Thursday June 15, 2017   Watch the Video Facebook: POLITICO Live’s Facebook Page has More »

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Regulatory expert Robert Crandall spoke at Clemson Oct. 31

Rick Uhlmann, College of Business October 21, 2016 Deregulation would unleash efficiencies and enhance U.S. spending and productivity growth, according More »

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A Century of Spectrum Overregulation and the Quest to Liberate Wireless Technologies

via Hudson Institute With the FCC’s relentless drive to regulate new technologies, a look back at the history of the More »

FCC and the Internet: In Search of Bandwidth

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Regulators are trying to create a more flexible, competitive model for allocation of bandwidth for mobile data.
July 8, 2017 12:34 a.m. ET

The Radio Act of 1927, the brainchild of then-Secretary of Commerce Herbert C. Hoover, created a regulatory regime for carefully parceling out airwaves according to a “public interest” standard. It was said to be necessary to prevent chaos—“etheric bedlam.”

In fact, it was not. Rather, it reflected Washington politics that favored incumbent interests—the first few visionaries who opened radio stations and enjoyed commercial…

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Thank Goodness Apple’s iPhone Violated ‘Net Neutrality’ in 2007

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By Thomas Hazlett
June 29, 2017

Ten years ago this week the Apple iPhone, described by Steve Jobs as a “revolutionary product” that “changes everything,” went on sale for the first time. A million flew off the shelves in just ten weeks and a decade later—with more than a billion sold worldwide—the iPhone has transformed the way we live, work and do business.

But even as the fanboys and girls were camping out to be at the front of the line, harsh critics queued. Columbia law professor Tim Wu denounced the iPhone as “anticompetitive.” Nested exclusively with AT&T and lurking in a “walled garden,” the iPhone rollout violated “network neutrality,” a term coined by Mr. Wu to describe his preferred platform for fixed and wireless communications.

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A Short History of Radio Explains the iPhone’s Success

JUNE 29, 2017

The iPhone roared into the marketplace 10 years ago today, and overwhelmed the wireless world. The smartphone’s iconic social significance has been duly noted. What has escaped attention is that the device burst into a sector long insulated from the slightest threat of disruptive innovation. The iPhone’s victorious attack followed — and required — a long arc of liberalization in airwaves, itself a stunning regulatory and marketplace triumph.

Here’s why the iPhone was able to succeed.

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