Licence-Exempt: The Emergence of Wi-Fi

Awesomize24
INFO, Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5.  Vic Hayes, Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, Wolter Lemstra, Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.In 1985, this development had been triggered by the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC)[1] when it opened the 915 MHz, the 2.4 and 5.8 GHz bands designated for industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) applications for the use by radio systems, under the condition that spread spectrum techniques would be used (FCC, 1985). Interestingly, the 1980 MITRE report that investigated the potential benefits, costs, and risks of spread spectrum communications on behalf of the FCC did not identify a strong requirement or need from the industry to assign radio frequency (RF) spectrum for spread spectrum based applications. The report concludes that spread spectrum technology is inherently more complex and thus more costly (Mitre Corp., 1980).

GDE Error: Error retrieving file - if necessary turn off error checking (404:Not Found)

Series Navigation<< History of Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) in the Unlicensed BandsGrazing on the Commons: The Emergence of Part 15 >>

Related posts:

This entry is part 7 of 9 in the series Unlicensed Wireless Conference 2008

Read previous post:
Awesomize4
History of Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) in the Unlicensed Bands

INFO, Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5.  Kevin J. Negus, Camp Ventures, Hyattville, Wyoming, Al Petrick, Jones-Petrick...

Close