Research

Scholars at the Information Economy Project research contemporary telecommunications and information technology issues through a law and economics paradigm. Primarily, IEP’s empirical research focuses on the effect of government policy and regulation on telecommunications, media, and intellectual property markets. Recently, IEP scholars have published papers on the impact of FCC spectrum licensing practices on the growth prospects of the mobile broadband industry and the effect of network neutrality regulations on consumer welfare. Additionally, IEP has released studies on antitrust and intellectual property rights, government policies designed to increase broadband penetration, and internet privacy and data security issues.  In addition to publishing leading academic work on these subjects, IEP sponsors academic conferences and lectures to serve as a platform for highly regarded scholars to present their work.

Research Articles

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New paper on Uber competition to taxi service in New York City: net benefits are high.

Tom Lam (Clemson) and Meng Liu (MIT) calculate surplus gains at 72 cents per dollar spent. "Demand and Consumer Surplus in the On-Demand Economy: The Case of Ride Sharing" Read it here: SSRN[...]
Valuing Spectrum Allocations

Valuing Spectrum Allocations

Thomas W. Hazlett, Clemson University Michael Honig, Northwestern University Abstract Observing trends in which Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have become widely popular, some argue that unlicensed allocations hosting such wireless technologies are increasingly valuable and that administrative spectrum allocations should shift accordingly. We challenge t[...]
Understanding the Disruptive Innovation Wrought by Computers and the Internet: A Review

Understanding the Disruptive Innovation Wrought by Computers and the Internet: A Review

Thomas Hazlett recently reviewed two new volumes on the Information Economy for the International Journal of Economics of Business.  Both Martin Campbell-Kelly and Daniel D. Garcia-Swartz, From mainframes to smartphones: A history of the international computer industry (Harvard University Press, 2015), and Shane Greenstein, How the Internet became [...]
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Search Engine Optimization: What Drives Organic Traffic to Retail Sites?

(Dr. Babur De Los Santos with Michael R. Baye and Matthijs R. Wildenbeest, Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, forthcoming)   The lion's share of retail traffic through search engines originates from organic (natural) rather than sponsored (paid) links. We use a dataset constructed from over 12,000 search terms and 2 milli[...]
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Search with Learning for Differentiated Products: Evidence from E-Commerce

(Dr. Babur De Los Santos with Ali Hortaçsu and Matthijs R. Wildenbeest, Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, forthcoming)   This paper provides a method to estimate search costs in a differentiated product environment in which consumers are uncertain about the utility distribution. Consumers learn about the utility distribution[...]
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E-book Pricing and Vertical Restraints

(Dr. Babur De Los Santos with Matthijs R. Wildenbeest)   This paper empirically analyzes how the use of vertical price restraints has impacted retail prices in the market for e-books. In 2010 five of the six largest publishers simultaneously adopted the agency model of book sales, allowing them to directly set retail prices. This led the[...]
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Searching for Physical and Digital Media: The Evolution of Platforms for Finding Books

(Dr. Babur De Los Santos with Michael R. Baye and and Matthijs R. Wildenbeest, in NBER's Economic Analysis of the Digital Economy, ed. by S. Greenstein, A. Goldfarb, and C. Tucker. University of Chicago Press, May 2015.)   This chapter provides a data-driven overview of the different online platforms that consumers use to search fo[...]
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What principles of governance does spectrum policy need?

What lessons can be learned for spectrum policy from the management of other natural resources? Here, an expert on resource management says good governance depends on a transparent, rules-based approach that will minimise regulatory uncertainty. This stability is key to encouraging the necessary investment in networks. Read the full research her[...]
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Optimizing Click-through in Online Rankings for Partially Anonymous Consumers

(Dr. Babur De Los Santos with Sergei Koulayev, invited for third round review, Marketing Science)   The vast amount of information available online has revolutionized the way firms present consumers with product options. Presenting the best alternatives first reduces search costs associated with a consumer finding the right product. We u[...]
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What's in a Name? Measuring Prominence, and Its Impact on Organic Traffic from Search Engines

(Dr. Babur De Los Santos with Michael R. Baye and and Matthijs R. Wildenbeest, Information Economics and Policy, forthcoming)   Organic product search results on Google and Bing do not systematically include information about seller characteristics (e.g., feedback ratings and prices). Consequently, it is often assumed that a retailer'[...]
Hazlett on The Rationality of U.S. Regulation of the Broadcast Spectrum in the 1934 Communications Act

Hazlett on The Rationality of U.S. Regulation of the Broadcast Spectrum in the 1934 Communications Act

On the 80th anniversary of the Communications Act, the November 2014 issue of The Review of Industrial Organization looks back at the landmark legislation and ahead to the future of broadcast regulation. The journal features an article by Thomas W. Hazlett, "The Rationality of U.S. Regulation of the Broadcast Spectrum in the 1934 Communications Act[...]
IEP Scholar Sarah Oh's Paper on the Effects of the Discount Rate and Urbanicity on E-rate Funds

IEP Scholar Sarah Oh's Paper on the Effects of the Discount Rate and Urbanicity on E-rate Funds

IEP Scholar Sarah Oh has written a paper entitled Effects of the Discount Rate and Urbanicity on E-rate Funds from 1998-2012. The abstract from the paper reads as follows: Broadband in schools has been financially supported by the E-rate program for over fifteen years in the United States. Although prior studies have measured impacts  of demogra[...]
Hazlett, Oh, and Skorup on the Effects of Prohibiting Handset Bundling in Finland and Belgium

Hazlett, Oh, and Skorup on the Effects of Prohibiting Handset Bundling in Finland and Belgium

Thomas Hazlett joined IEP Scholars Sarah Oh and Brent Skorup in authoring a paper studying the effects of laws passed in Finland and Belgium prohibiting the bundling of cell phones with 3G wireless broadband plans. The paper compares 3G subscribership rates in these countries with other European countries that did not place such a ban on bundling. [...]
Efficient Spectrum Reallocation with Hold-Ups and Without Nirvana

Efficient Spectrum Reallocation with Hold-Ups and Without Nirvana

Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law and Economics and Director, Information Economy Project, George Mason University and Clemson University In 2010, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) determined that up to 20 television channels should be shifted to mobile services. If successful, the reform could generate over $1 trillion in soc[...]
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The Evolution of Product Search

(Dr. Babur De Los Santos with Michael R. Baye and and Matthijs R. Wildenbeest, Journal of Law, Economics & Policy, 9(2): 201-21, 2013)   This paper examines the evolution of product search. We provide an overview of product search in the pre-internet era, and discuss how online search evolved from directory based search in the ear[...]
Federalist Society's Engage Magazine: Hazlett Weighs in on Spectrum Crisis

Federalist Society's Engage Magazine: Hazlett Weighs in on Spectrum Crisis

The wireless industry has been one of the brightest spots in what has been a relatively stagnant post-recession economy. Yet, industry observers have noted that the diminishing availability of radio spectrum has hampered potential growth in the mobile sector. Moreover, the spectrum shortage is predicted to only worsen with increased demand for mobi[...]
Skorup and Thierer on Cronyism in the IT Sector

Skorup and Thierer on Cronyism in the IT Sector

IEP's Brent Skorup and the Mercatus Center's senior research fellow Adam Thierer have published a working paper regarding the history of cronyism in the IT sector. Skorup and Thierer argue in the paper, which is titled "A History of Cronyism and Capture in the Information Economy Sector," that growth and entrepreneurship in the information economy [...]
Skorup on the Efficient Use of Federal Spectrum

Skorup on the Efficient Use of Federal Spectrum

IEP's Brent Skorup has recently published a paper through George Mason's Mercatus Center that examines proposals for reallocating spectrum held by the federal government for use in mobile broadband networks. Considering the quickly increasing popularity of mobile broadband services, the efficient transfer of spectrum to the private market has wide [...]
Thierer and Skorup on Tim Wu's Separations Principle

Thierer and Skorup on Tim Wu's Separations Principle

IEP's Brent Skorup and Adam Thierer, senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center, have published a law review article on vertical integration in the information economy in the Federal Communications Law Journal. From the abstract: Are information sectors sufficiently different from other sectors of the economy such that more stringent anti[...]
Hazlett and Skorup on LightSquared and Spectrum Rights

Hazlett and Skorup on LightSquared and Spectrum Rights

IEP's Thomas Hazlett and Brent Skorup recently completed a new research piece, Tragedy of the Regulatory Commons: LightSquared and the Missing Spectrum Rights. The Duke Law & Technology Review will publish the article later this year. Hazlett and Skorup describe how the FCC's rights assignment process caused the GPS-LightSquared conflict, resulting[...]
The Law and Economics of Network Neutrality

The Law and Economics of Network Neutrality

Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law and Economics and Director, Information Economy Project, George Mason University Joshua D. Wright, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law and Department of Economics Indiana Law Review, Vol. 45 (2012). This Paper critiques the FCC's net neutrality (NN) policy—specifically, the no blocking[...]
Regulating Broadband Networks:  Assessing the Global Data for Evidence-Based Policy

Regulating Broadband Networks: Assessing the Global Data for Evidence-Based Policy

Bronwyn Howell, Economist, New Zealand Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation An examination of the historical context suggests that comparative analysis of the development of the New Zealand and United States industries over the past thirty years, and the more recent experiences of the past thirteen years as New Zealand has pursu[...]
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Testing Models of Consumer Search Using Data on Web Browsing and Purchasing Behavior

Testing Models of Consumer Search Using Data on Web Browsing and Purchasing Behavior (Dr. Babur De Los Santos with Ali Hortaçsu and Matthijs R. Wildenbeest, American Economic Review, 102(6): 2955–80, 2012.)   Using a large dataset on web browsing and purchasing behavior we test to what extent consumers are searching in accord[...]
Exactitude in Defining Rights: Radio Spectrum and the 'Harmful Interference' Conundrum

Exactitude in Defining Rights: Radio Spectrum and the 'Harmful Interference' Conundrum

Berkeley Technology Law Journal Vol. 28, 2013, George Mason Law & Economics Research Paper No. 12-55.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Sarah Oh, Research Fellow, Information Economy Project, and Ph.D. Student, George Mason University Department of Economics. In the century since the R[...]
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Consumer Search on the Internet

This paper analyzes search frictions in online markets using novel data on the web browsing and purchasing behavior of a large panel of consumers. This dataset is unique in that consumer search behavior prior to a transaction is observed. Although recent models have shown that large price dispersion persists in various markets, and this dispersion [...]
Patterns of Broadband Efficiency in the U.S.

Patterns of Broadband Efficiency in the U.S.

Growth and Change, Centre for Business and Economic Research (CBER), forthcoming 2012.  Jitendra Parajuli, Ph.D. Candidate, George Mason University, School of Public Policy, Kingsley E. Haynes, University Professor and Hazel Endowed Chair at the School of Public Policy, George Mason University. The authors would like to thank the editor, three[...]
Walled Garden Rivalry: The Creation of Mobile Network Ecosystems

Walled Garden Rivalry: The Creation of Mobile Network Ecosystems

George Mason Law & Economics Research Paper No. 11-50.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, David Teece, Thomas W. Tusher Professor in Global Business, UC Berkeley Haas School of Business, Leonard Waverman, Dean of the Haskayne School of Business at the University of Calgary. Dynamic comp[...]
What Really Matters in Spectrum Allocation Design

What Really Matters in Spectrum Allocation Design

10 Nw. J. Tech. & Intell. Prop. 93 (2012). Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Roberto E. Muñoz, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Project and Professor, Federico, Santa María Technical University, Santiago, Chile, Diego Avanzini, Visiting Scholar, Information Economy Project. [...]
FCC Regulation Versus Antitrust: How Net Neutrality is Defining the Boundaries

FCC Regulation Versus Antitrust: How Net Neutrality is Defining the Boundaries

52 Boston College L. Rev. 1627-86 (2011).  Babette E.L. Boliek, Associate Professor of Law at Pepperdine University School of Law. This Article challenges the various jurisdictional theories that underpin the FCC’s net neutrality regulation. The assertion of jurisdiction by the FCC over any aspect of the Internet ecosystem has raised populist, con[...]
Policy-Induced Competition: The Case of Cable TV Set-Top Boxes

Policy-Induced Competition: The Case of Cable TV Set-Top Boxes

12 Minn. J.L. Sci. & Tech. 279 (2011).  Ralitza A. Grigorova-Minchev, Vice President, Arlington Economics, Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. "...This failure is, in less glossy reports, the assessment of the FCC itself. In the Commission’s words, the CableCARD technology developed to fa[...]
The Federal Communication Commission's Excellent Mobile Competition Adventure

The Federal Communication Commission's Excellent Mobile Competition Adventure

Mercatus Center Working Paper No. 11-46.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law Stressed-out undergrads meet deadlines for term papers by cramming facts, figures, and buzzwords; splicing Wikipedia entries; pasting select expert quotations; citing everything twice; inserting some nifty, multi-col[...]
The Case for Liberal Spectrum Licenses: A Technical and Economic Perspective

The Case for Liberal Spectrum Licenses: A Technical and Economic Perspective

26 Berkeley Tech. L.J. 1037 (2011). Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Evan T. Leo, Partner, Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel, P.L.L.C. The traditional system of radio spectrum allocation has inefficiently restricted wireless services. Alternatively, liberal licenses ceding de[...]
Exclusion Principles and Receiver Boundaries on Spectrum Resources

Exclusion Principles and Receiver Boundaries on Spectrum Resources

39th Annual TPRC (2011).  Sarah Oh, Operations and Research Director of the Information Economy Project at George Mason University School of Law. This article will discuss exclusion principles for old receivers that occupy spectrum resources. Asymmetric interference in old receivers and the costs of receiver design are two key factors in the analy[...]
Anti-Competitive Behaviors in Managed Competition: The Case of China's Telecommunications Industry

Anti-Competitive Behaviors in Managed Competition: The Case of China's Telecommunications Industry

Communications of the Association for Information Systems, Volume 28, No. 1, Article 36 (2011).  Zhong Liu, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Project, Southwestern University of Finance & Economics, Chengdu, China, Jason Whalley, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK. The Chinese telecommunications industry has attracted considerable interes[...]
If Search Neutrality is the Answer, What's the Question?

If Search Neutrality is the Answer, What's the Question?

ICLE Antitrust & Consumer Protection Program White Paper Series, Lewis & Clark Law School Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2011-14, George Mason Law & Economics Research Paper No. 11-37.  Geoffrey A. Manne, Executive Director, International Center for Law & Economics (ICLE); Lecturer in Law, Lewis & Clark Law School, Joshua D. W[...]
Market Power in U.S. Broadband Services

Market Power in U.S. Broadband Services

38 Review of Industrial Organization (March, 2011), 151-71.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Dennis L. Weisman, Department of Economics, Kansas State University. The U.S. telecommunications industry has come under scrutiny amid concerns that regulatory policies have been too permissive. T[...]
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The Economics of the Long Tail

The Economics of the Long Tail∗ Todd D. Kendall and Kevin Tsui Abstract Anderson (2006) argues that e-commerce and other new technologies improve efficiency by encouraging the entry of new producers and innovations, creating a “long tail” of niche products while reducing the market share of previously popular products. We study the strategic intera[...]
Does Antitrust Enforcement in High Tech Markets Benefit Consumers? Stock Price Evidence from FTC v. Intel

Does Antitrust Enforcement in High Tech Markets Benefit Consumers? Stock Price Evidence from FTC v. Intel

38 Review of Industrial Organization 387-404 (2011).  Joshua D. Wright, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law. Antitrust enforcement efforts in the United States and abroad have been ramped up in high-tech industries, rekindling stale and largely unresolved debates concerning the appropriate role of antitrust enforcement in high-[...]
Modular Confines of Mobile Networks: Are iPhones iPhony?

Modular Confines of Mobile Networks: Are iPhones iPhony?

19 Supreme Ct. Econ. Rev. 67-102 (2011).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. Strategic investments by wireless carriers and others are generating rapid development of the “mobile ecology,” increasing modularity even while embracing and extending vertical controls. Coordination among compleme[...]
The Rise and Fall of the First Patent Thicket: The Sewing Machine War of the 1850s

The Rise and Fall of the First Patent Thicket: The Sewing Machine War of the 1850s

 53 Ariz. L. Rev. 165 (2011).  Adam Mossoff, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law. After Professor Michael Heller proposed that excessively fragmented property rights in land can frustrate its commercial development, patent scholars have debated vigorously whether Heller’s anticommons theory applies to property rights in inven[...]
On Being Misled by Transaction Cost Economics: Externalities, Commons, Anti-commons, and Gridlocks

On Being Misled by Transaction Cost Economics: Externalities, Commons, Anti-commons, and Gridlocks

53 Ariz. L. Rev. 1 (2011). Harold Demsetz, Professor Emeritus, UCLA Department of Economics. During the last half-century transaction cost became a prominent consideration in discussions about externalities and ownership arrangements. The author of this essay contributed to this development in the earlier part of this half-century but ha[...]
Autonomy and Independence: The Normative Face of Transaction Costs

Autonomy and Independence: The Normative Face of Transaction Costs

53 Ariz. L. Rev. 145 (2011). Robert P. Merges, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati Professor of Law and Technology, Director, Berkeley Center for Law & Technology. "Anticommons theory made a splash, and is today being expanded and applied, because it shifted our collective attention in a crucial way. Before the 1990s, the big poli[...]
Google Book Search in the Gridlock Economy

Google Book Search in the Gridlock Economy

53 Ariz. L. Rev. 131 (2011). Doug Lichtman, Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law. Michael Heller’s Gridlock Economy popularizes a concept that Heller has developed over nearly two decades of influential academic writing: the notion that, when it comes to property rights, too many rights-endowed cooks really can spoil the broth. I[...]
The Wasteland: Anticommons, White Spaces, and the Fallacy of Spectrum

The Wasteland: Anticommons, White Spaces, and the Fallacy of Spectrum

53 Ariz. L. Rev. 213 (2011). Kevin Werbach, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Associate Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics. “I urge you, I urge you to put the people's airwaves to the service of the people and the cause of freedom. You must help prepare a generation for great decisions. You must help a great natio[...]
Tragedy T.V.: Rights Fragmentation and the Junk Band Problem

Tragedy T.V.: Rights Fragmentation and the Junk Band Problem

53 Ariz. L. Rev. 83 (2011).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Director, Information Economy Project, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law Tragedy of the anticommons occurs when property rules fail to enable efficient social coordination. In radio spectrum, rights issued to airwave users have traditionally been severely[...]
Exclusion and Exclusivity in Gridlock

Exclusion and Exclusivity in Gridlock

53 Ariz. L. Rev. 9 (2011). Eric R. Claeys, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law. Michael Heller earned respect among property scholars in his 1998 article The Tragedy of the Anticommons: Property in the Transition from Marx to Markets. The conception of a “tragedy of the commons” had been popularized by Garrett Hardin in a 1968 [...]
Epstein: Why There is Too Little, Not Too Much, Private Property

Epstein: Why There is Too Little, Not Too Much, Private Property

53 Ariz. L. Rev. 51 (2011). Richard A. Epstein, James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago. The topic of this conference is Michael Heller's provocative new book on The Gridlock Economy.1 The central thesis of the book is that one critical obstacle to overall social advancement is the frag[...]
Self-Regulation: How Wikipedia Leverages User-Generated Quality Control Under Section 230

Self-Regulation: How Wikipedia Leverages User-Generated Quality Control Under Section 230

SSRN 2010.  Kathleen M. Walsh, Wikimedia Foundation Trustee and Executive Secretary of the Board of Trustees; George Mason University School of Law, Sarah Oh, Operations and Research Director of the Information Economy Project, George Mason University School of Law. As Virginia Woolf once wrote, “[T]o enjoy freedom, we have…to control ourselves.” [...]
Regulating Communications: Stories from the First Hundred Years

Regulating Communications: Stories from the First Hundred Years

13 Green Bag 2d 303 (2010).  Glen O. Robinson, Commissioner, Federal Communications Commission, 1974-76, David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law Emeritus University of Virginia School of Law. This year we celebrate a century of electronic communications regulation. Well, maybe “celebrate” isn’t the right word. Critics of regulation [...]
The Overly Active Corpse of Red Lion

The Overly Active Corpse of Red Lion

9 Northwestern J. Tech. & IP 51-95 (2010).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Sarah Oh, Operations and Research Director, Information Economy Project, Drew Clark, Executive Director, Partnership for a Connected Illinois, Inc., Chairman and Publisher, Broadband Census LLC. The Northwes[...]
Posner: Keynes and Coase

Posner: Keynes and Coase

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School. Richard A. Posner, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, Senior Lecturer, University of Chicago School of Law.   At first glance Keynes and Coase have nothing in common except that they w[...]
Commercial Advertising and the First Amendment

Commercial Advertising and the First Amendment

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School.  Geoffrey R. Stone, Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of the University of Chicago Law School. In his path-breaking 1977 article, Advertising and Free Speech, Ronald Coase challenged the conven[...]
Regulation and the Nature of the Firm: The Case of U.S. Regional Airlines

Regulation and the Nature of the Firm: The Case of U.S. Regional Airlines

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School. Michael E. Levine, Distinguished Research Scholar Senior Lecturer at the New York University School of Law. The organization of airline networks, and particularly of the interaction between the less dense part[...]
Measuring Coase's Influence

Measuring Coase's Influence

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School. William M. Landes, Clifton R. Musser Professor of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Law School, Sonia Lahr-Pastor, Research Scholar. Citations measure a scholar’s influence. That Ronald Coase is among the [...]
R.H. Coase and the Neoclassical Model of the Economic System

R.H. Coase and the Neoclassical Model of the Economic System

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School.  Harold Demsetz, Professor Emeritus, UCLA Department of Economics. It is clear from articles I have written for the New Palgrave Dictionary of Law and Economics and other publications that I have high regard fo[...]
Competence as a Random Variable: One More Tribute to Ronald Coase

Competence as a Random Variable: One More Tribute to Ronald Coase

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School.  Richard A. Epstein, James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago. The work of Ronald Coase is notable for how it introduces the notion of transactions costs to explain [...]
How to Keep a Secret: The Decisive Advantage of Corporations

How to Keep a Secret: The Decisive Advantage of Corporations

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School.  Robert Cooter, Herman F. Selvin Professor of Law and Director of the Program in Law and Economics at the UC Berkeley School of Law. In the 1950s socialists around the world built gigantic steel plants like[...]
Why the Entry Regulation of the China Mobile Phone Manufacturing Industry Collapsed: The Impact of Technological Innovation on Institutional Transformation

Why the Entry Regulation of the China Mobile Phone Manufacturing Industry Collapsed: The Impact of Technological Innovation on Institutional Transformation

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School. Zhimin Liao, Coase Institute Fellow and currently an L.L.M. candidate at Harvard Law School (2009-2010), Xiofang Chen, Coase Institute Fellow and Ph.D. candidate at Renmin University of China (2008-2011). Thi[...]
Radio Spectrum and the Disruptive Clarity of Ronald Coase

Radio Spectrum and the Disruptive Clarity of Ronald Coase

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School. Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, David Porter, Donna and David Janes Endowed Chair in Experimental Economics, Chapman University, Vernon L. Smith, Profe[...]
Coase and the New Zealand Spectrum Reforms

Coase and the New Zealand Spectrum Reforms

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School. Charles L. Jackson, Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering, George Washington University. In 1989, New Zealand’s Parliament enacted a new statute, the Radiocommunications Act 1989, that expli[...]
Coase, Transaction Costs, and the Spread of the Rectangular Survey for Land Demarcation within the British Empire

Coase, Transaction Costs, and the Spread of the Rectangular Survey for Land Demarcation within the British Empire

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School 2011. Gary D. Libecap, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management and Department of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Dean Lueck, Dept. of Agricultural & Resource Economics, The U[...]
The Effect of Allowance Allocation on Cap-and-Trade System Performance

The Effect of Allowance Allocation on Cap-and-Trade System Performance

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School. Robert W. Hahn, Senior Visiting Fellow, Smith School, Oxford, Robert N. Stavins, Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School. We begin with “The Problem of Social Cost” (1960) … [...]
Has "Unlicensed" in Part 15 Worked? A Case Study

Has "Unlicensed" in Part 15 Worked? A Case Study

INFO, Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5.  Tim Pozar, TM Pozar Telecommunications Engineering, Mill Valley, California. The Federal Communications Commission established the provisions for unlicensed operations of intentional radiators or transmitters for commutations in what was called the industrial scientific and medical bands[...]
Unleashing Innovation: Making the FCC User-Friendly

Unleashing Innovation: Making the FCC User-Friendly

INFO, Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5. Stephen J. Lukasik, Center for International Strategy, Technology and Policy, The Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, Georgia Institute of Technology. There is a large literature on the issue of regulation and technological innovation from the varied perspectives of history,[...]
Grazing on the Commons: The Emergence of Part 15

Grazing on the Commons: The Emergence of Part 15

INFO, Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5. Henry Goldberg, Goldberg, Godles, Wiener and Wright, Washington, DC.   This article gives an account of how unlicensed radio services moved from being a by-product of the ISM bands to a deliberate spectrum allocation, with clearly defined goals and objectives that could b[...]
Licence-Exempt: The Emergence of Wi-Fi

Licence-Exempt: The Emergence of Wi-Fi

INFO, Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5.  Vic Hayes, Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, Wolter Lemstra, Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.In 1985, this development had been triggered by[...]
History of Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) in the Unlicensed Bands

History of Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) in the Unlicensed Bands

INFO, Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5.  Kevin J. Negus, Camp Ventures, Hyattville, Wyoming, Al Petrick, Jones-Petrick Associates, Orlando, Florida.The wireless local area network (WLAN) is today a ubiquitous device often taken for granted as a default interface for networked devices by users and manufacturers alike. But not v[...]
Wi-Fi and Bluetooth: The Path from Carter and Reagan-era Faith in Deregulation to Widespread Products Impacting Our World

Wi-Fi and Bluetooth: The Path from Carter and Reagan-era Faith in Deregulation to Widespread Products Impacting Our World

INFO, August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5 (p. 19-35). Michael J. Marcus, Marcus Spectrum Solutions LLC. On May 9, 1985 the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), in a meeting that attracted little attention outside the few companies that lobby the agency, adopted a set of rules dealing with the esoteric topic of spread spectrum modulation. But [...]
Unlicensed To Kill: A Brief History of the Part 15 Rules

Unlicensed To Kill: A Brief History of the Part 15 Rules

INFO, Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5. Kenneth R. Carter, WIK-Consult, GmbH, Bad Honnef, Germany. The Information Economy Project congratulates Kenneth R. Carter, whose paper from the April 2008 IEP Conference, Unleashing Unlicensed, has been awarded the Best Paper of 2009 by the multi-disciplinary journal, info.  Mr. Carter's p[...]
Unlicensed Wireless Policy Conference: Guest Editorial

Unlicensed Wireless Policy Conference: Guest Editorial

Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5.  Charles L. Jackson, Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering, George Washington University. Unlicensed wireless has become an industry, with hundreds of millions of radios in use today. These devices range from short-range wireless computer keyboards to microwave links with ranges of seve[...]
A Welfare Analysis of Spectrum Allocation Policies

A Welfare Analysis of Spectrum Allocation Policies

40 RAND Journal of Economics 424–54, Autumn 2009.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Roberto E. Muñoz, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Project and Professor, Federico Santa María Technical University, Santiago, Chile. Economic analysis of spectrum policy focuses on government revenues de[...]
U.S. Wireless License Auctions: 1994-2009

U.S. Wireless License Auctions: 1994-2009

Presentation Date: July 14, 2009, ACCC Conference, Brisbane, Australia.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. Long resisted by policy makers, competitive bidding for U.S. wireless licenses commenced July 25, 1994. Since then, some 85 auctions have been held, 27,484 licenses sold, and $52.6 b[...]
Spectrum Allocation in Latin America: An Economic Analysis

Spectrum Allocation in Latin America: An Economic Analysis

21 Information Economics & Policy 261-78 (2009). Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Roberto E. Muñoz, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Project and Professor, Federico Santa María Technical University, Santiago, Chile. As elsewhere, wireless markets play a crucial role in Latin Americ[...]
Patent Holdup, Antitrust and Innovation: Harness or Noose?

Patent Holdup, Antitrust and Innovation: Harness or Noose?

61 Alabama L. Rev. 559-70 (2010).  Review Issue of INNOVATION FOR THE 21ST CENTURY: HARNESSING THE POWER OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND ANTITRUST LAW.  Joshua D. Wright, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law, Aubrey N. Stuempfle, George Mason University School of Law, J.D. This essay reviews Michael Carrier’s analysis of antitrust [...]
An Optimal Way To License the Radio Spectrum

An Optimal Way To License the Radio Spectrum

33 Telecommunications Policy 230-37 (Apr.-May 2009).  William Webb, Head of Research and Development and Senior Technologist, OFCOM. Radio spectrum licences are generally specified in terms of the power a holder is allowed to transmit. However, if licences become flexible, allowing change of use and technology, then this licensing approach could r[...]
Federalism, Substantive Preemption, and Limits on Antitrust: An Application to Patent Holdup

Federalism, Substantive Preemption, and Limits on Antitrust: An Application to Patent Holdup

5 Journal of Competition Law and Economics 469-516 (2009).  Bruce H. Kobayashi, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law, Joshua D. Wright, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law. In Credit Suisse v. Billing, the Court held that the securities law implicitly precludes the application of the antitrust laws to the con[...]
Why the Supreme Court was Correct to Deny Certiorari in FTC v. Rambus

Why the Supreme Court was Correct to Deny Certiorari in FTC v. Rambus

Global Competition Policy (March 2009).  Joshua D. Wright, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law. In November 2008, the Federal Trade Commission petitioned the Supreme Court to review the D.C. Circuit's decision in FTC v. Rambus. That decision reversed the Commission's finding that Rambus knowingly failed to disclose a patent t[...]
Optimal Abolition of FCC Spectrum Allocation

Optimal Abolition of FCC Spectrum Allocation

22 Journal of Economic Perspectives 103-28 (Winter 2008).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. Ronald Coase based his 1959 call for spectrum markets on theoretical conjecture. Today abundant evidence supports his case. Targeted liberalization in cellular markets, as contrasted with regulatory[...]
Can Wireless Infrastructure Keep Up In Ultra Broadband? Gigabits vs. Megahertz

Can Wireless Infrastructure Keep Up In Ultra Broadband? Gigabits vs. Megahertz

Presentation, CITI 25th Anniversary International Summit on Media & Communication 2008.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. Overview: (1) Yes, It will take Liberal Licenses; broad, exclusive spectrum rights productive; more bandwidth; overlays for reallocations; mobile voice now dominati[...]
Transcript from The Gore Commission, 10 Years Later: The Public Interest Obligations of Digital TV Broadcasters in Perfect Hindsight

Transcript from The Gore Commission, 10 Years Later: The Public Interest Obligations of Digital TV Broadcasters in Perfect Hindsight

The Gore Commission, 10 Years Later: The Public Interest Obligations of Digital TV Broadcasters in Perfect Hindsight, A mini-conference • Friday, October 3, 2008, 8:30 a.m. National Press Club, 529 14th St. NW, 13th Floor, Washington, DC Transcript / Prepared by IEP Staff (not exact but close to verbatim) Thomas Hazlett: Our next guest is[...]
Horizontal Mergers Among IP Licensors and IP Licensees

Horizontal Mergers Among IP Licensors and IP Licensees

Luncheon Keynote Presentation to the Merger Analysis in High-Tech Markets Conference, 2008.  Luke M. Froeb, William Oehmig Associate Professor of Management, Owen Graduate School of Management, Vanderbilt University. Joint Work: Mike Shor, Steven Tschantz. Disclaimer: Exploratory Analysis. Outline: Motivation: merger analysis. Question 1: Are hori[...]
Are 'Online Markets' Real and Relevant? From Monster/Hotjobs to Google/DoubleClick

Are 'Online Markets' Real and Relevant? From Monster/Hotjobs to Google/DoubleClick

Journal of Competition Law & Economics, 4(3), 655–662 (Sept. 2008). Bruce D. Abramson, President, Informationism, Inc. & Senior Consultant, CRA International. "As the novelty of the Internet wears off, on-line merger analysis looks increasingly like off-line merger analysis. Most of the things that make interesting on-line mergers interest[...]
Antitrust in Orbit: Some Dynamics of Horizontal Merger Analysis in General and with Respect to XM-Sirius

Antitrust in Orbit: Some Dynamics of Horizontal Merger Analysis in General and with Respect to XM-Sirius

Journal of Competition Law & Economics, 4(3), 753–773 (Sept. 2008). Thomas W. Hazlett, Director, Information Economy Project and Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. "Horizontal merger evaluation is heavily reliant on market definition. An SSNIP framework formats the analysis, and demand elasticity evidence [...]
Evaluating Market Power with Two-Sided Demand and Preemptive Offers to Dissipate Monopoly Rent: Lessons for High-Technology Industries from the Antitrust Division's Approval of the XM-Sirius Satellite Radio Merger

Evaluating Market Power with Two-Sided Demand and Preemptive Offers to Dissipate Monopoly Rent: Lessons for High-Technology Industries from the Antitrust Division's Approval of the XM-Sirius Satellite Radio Merger

Journal of Competition Law & Economics, 4(3), 697–751(Sept. 2008).  J. Greg Sidak, Chairman, Criterion Economics, Hal J. Singer, Criterion Economics (currently President, Empiris, LLC). Can the standard merger analysis of the Department of Justice’s and Federal Trade Commission’s Horizontal Merger Guidelines accommodate mergers in high-techn[...]
Technological Change and Merger Policy's Third Era

Technological Change and Merger Policy's Third Era

Presentation to Merger Analysis in High Technology Markets Conference 2008. Howard Shelanski, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center. Changes in Merger Policy Over the Last Century. Evolutionary Changes: Antimonopoly Era (1904-1973), Consumer Welfare Era (1973-2004), Dynamic Efficiency Era (2004-). Cyclical Changes: Merger review has[...]
Market Definition in Online Markets

Market Definition in Online Markets

Journal of Competition Law & Economics, 4(3), 639–653 (Sept. 2008).  Michael R. Baye, Bert Elwert Professor of Business Economics, Kelley School of Business, Indiana University. Although the basic principles used to define a relevant market or to analyze unilateral competitive effects in traditional retail settings also apply in online retail [...]
Sky Wars: The Attempted Merger of Dish/DirecTV

Sky Wars: The Attempted Merger of Dish/DirecTV

Presentation to the Merger Analysis in High-Tech Markets Conference, 2008.  Richard J. Gilbert, Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley. A High Tech Merger? Relatively new product: High Power Direct Broadcast Satellite TV. DirecTV launched 1994. EchoStar/Dish launched 1996. Large claimed efficiencies. Platform issues. Incompatible encryption formats. [...]
Defining the Relevant Product Market for the Google-DoubleClick Merger

Defining the Relevant Product Market for the Google-DoubleClick Merger

Presentation to the Merger Analysis in High-Tech Markets Conference, 2008.  Robert W. Hahn, Senior Visiting Fellow, Smith School, Oxford, Hal J. Singer, Criterion Economics (currently President, Empiris, LLC). In 2007, U.S. advertisers were expected for the first time to spend more on online advertising than on radio advertising. Source: eMark[...]
Nice Theory But Where's The Evidence: The Use of Economic Evidence to Evaluate Vertical and Conglomerate Mergers in the US and EU

Nice Theory But Where's The Evidence: The Use of Economic Evidence to Evaluate Vertical and Conglomerate Mergers in the US and EU

Presentation to Merger Analysis in High Technology Markets Conference 2008.  Mary T. Coleman, Managing Director, LECG (currently SVP Compass Lexecon). Brief description of primary vertical theories of potential competitive concern from a merger. Input foreclosure. Customer foreclosure. Elements for a vertical theory to be plausible. Ability to for[...]
Deploying Cognitive Radio: Economic, Legal and Policy Issues

Deploying Cognitive Radio: Economic, Legal and Policy Issues

2 International Journal of Communication 1114-24 (2008).  Gerald R. Faulhaber, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Project and Professor Emeritus of Business and Public Policy at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Over the past decade, the demand by commercial, military and consumers for use of the electromagnetic spectrum has [...]
Property Rights and Wireless License Values

Property Rights and Wireless License Values

51 Journal of Law & Economics 563-98 (August 2008).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. While extending the scope of spectrum property rights promotes efficiency, such reforms are often deterred by equity concerns. Theoretically, however, the windfalls may be negative. Relaxing license r[...]
Part 4 - A Rejoinder to Weiser and Hatfield on Spectrum Rights

Part 4 - A Rejoinder to Weiser and Hatfield on Spectrum Rights

15 George Mason Law Review 1031-39 (June 2008).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. "The current spectrum regulatory system generates an enormous volume of verbiage but precious little analysis. This makes the probing and provocative discussion initiated by Professors Phil Weiser and Dale Ha[...]
Part 2 - A Law & Economics Approach to Spectrum Property Rights: A Response to Professors Weiser & Hatfield

Part 2 - A Law & Economics Approach to Spectrum Property Rights: A Response to Professors Weiser & Hatfield

15 George Mason Law Review 975-1023 (June 2008).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. "The provocative article by Phil Weiser and Dale Hatfield presents a challenging analysis of property rights to radio spectrum. Its main thesis is that a property system, by which they mean a private propert[...]
Part 3 - Property Rights in Spectrum: A Reply to Hazlett

Part 3 - Property Rights in Spectrum: A Reply to Hazlett

15 Geo. Mason Law Review 1025 (2008).  Philip J. Weiser, Professor of Law and Telecommunications at the University of Colorado, Dale Hatfield is an Adjunct Professor of Telecommunications at the University of Colorado. "As the many citations to his prior work in our article, Spectrum Policy Reform and the Next Frontier of Property Rights, indicate[...]
Part 1 - Spectrum Policy Reform and the Next Frontier of Property Rights

Part 1 - Spectrum Policy Reform and the Next Frontier of Property Rights

15 Geo. Mason Law Review 549 (2008).  Philip J. Weiser, Professor of Law and Telecommunications at the University of Colorado, Dale Hatfield is an Adjunct Professor of Telecommunications at the University of Colorado. "Wireless spectrum is hot property. In early 2008, a number of firms bid almost $20 billion for the right to use 62 megahertz of sp[...]
Wireless Net Neutrality Regulation and the Problem with Pricing: An Empirical, Cautionary Tale

Wireless Net Neutrality Regulation and the Problem with Pricing: An Empirical, Cautionary Tale

16 Michigan Telecomm. & Tech. L. Rev. 1 (2009).  Babette E.L. Boliek, Associate Professor of Law at Pepperdine University School of Law. The imposition of network neutrality regulation on the mobile telecommunications market puts consumers at risk of facing higher prices and fewer Internet access options. The decision to regulate the mobile [...]
Liberal Rules for a 21st Century World: The U.S. Experience with Convergence

Liberal Rules for a 21st Century World: The U.S. Experience with Convergence

Paper Presented to Keidanren (Tokyo, Japan; Feb. 26, 2008).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. The obsolescence of traditional Postal Telephone and Telegraph (PTT) monopolies has forced liberalization in the telecommunications sector. This transition challenges policy makers with two visi[...]
Natural Experiments in U.S. Broadband Regulation

Natural Experiments in U.S. Broadband Regulation

7 Review of Network Economics 13–33 (Issue 4, December 2008).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Anil Caliskan, Research Economist. Regulations governing broadband networks are being considered. Natural experiments conducted with respect to "open access" rules yield probative marketplace ev[...]
Property Rights to Radio Spectrum in Guatemala and El Salvador: An Experiment in Liberalization

Property Rights to Radio Spectrum in Guatemala and El Salvador: An Experiment in Liberalization

3 Review of Law & Economics 437-484 (2007).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Giancarlo Ibarguen, Universidad Francisco Marroquin, Wayne A. Leighton, Senior Expert at Navigant Economics LLC, Adjunct Professor, U.S. liaison with Francisco Marroquín University in Guatemala. In most cou[...]
Personal Communications and Spectrum Policy For the 21st Century

Personal Communications and Spectrum Policy For the 21st Century

31 Telecommunications Policy 566-72 (Nov.-Dec. 2007). Martin Cooper, CEO, Arraycomm & “Father of the Cellphone”, Tullock Lecturer February 2007. People are mobile! They are naturally, inherently mobile. You see that every time you drive the streets of the District and the beltway. It seems that few people are where they want to be and they all[...]
Communicating During Emergencies: Toward Interoperability and Effective Information Management

Communicating During Emergencies: Toward Interoperability and Effective Information Management

59 Federal Communications Law Journal 547-74 (2007).  Philip J. Weiser, Department of Justice Antitrust Division, Professor of Law, University of Colorado at Boulder. The crisis of communications on 9/11 and in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina underscores that emergency responders are largely illequipped to communicate effectively in times o[...]
Fundamental Reform in Public Safety Communications Policy

Fundamental Reform in Public Safety Communications Policy

59 Federal Communications Law Journal 517-46 (2007). Jon M. Peha, Chief Technologist, Federal Communications Commission, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University. All across the country, there have been failures in the communications systems used by first responders, such as firefighters, police, paramedics, and the National Guard. These failures c[...]
Solving the Interoperability Problem: Are We On the Same Channel? An Essay on the Problems and Prospects for Public Safety Radio

Solving the Interoperability Problem: Are We On the Same Channel? An Essay on the Problems and Prospects for Public Safety Radio

59 Federal Communications Law Journal 493-516 (2007).  Gerald R. Faulhaber, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Project and Professor Emeritus of Business and Public Policy at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Public safety radio communication provides the essential link by which fire, police, emergency medical services (“EMS”),[...]
Sending Out an S.O.S.: Public Safety Communications Interoperability as a Collective Action Problem

Sending Out an S.O.S.: Public Safety Communications Interoperability as a Collective Action Problem

59 Federal Communications Law Journal 457-92 (2007). Jerry Brito, Senior Research Fellow, Mercatus Center, Federal Communications Law Journal. On September 11, 2001, officers from the New York City police and fire departments responded to the attacks on the World Trade Center. That morning, police and firefighters entered each of the Twin Towe[...]
The Spectrum Commons in Theory and Practice

The Spectrum Commons in Theory and Practice

2007 Stanford Technology Law Review 1 (2007).  Jerry Brito, Senior Research Fellow, Mercatus Center. The radio spectrum is a scarce resource that has been historically allocated through command-and-control regulation. Today, it is widely accepted that this type of allocation is as inefficient for spectrum as it would be for paper or land. Many com[...]
Keynote Address, Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy

Keynote Address, Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy

Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006. Irwin Mark Jacobs, Chairman of the Board, Qualcomm. LINKABIT – Founded October, 1968, QUALCOMM - Founded July 1, 1985. For Both Companies - No Products at Start. Strategy - Innovation: Digital & Wireless Communications & Applications. November 1989 - First[...]
Competitive v. Top-Down: the TV Band White Space Issue

Competitive v. Top-Down: the TV Band White Space Issue

 Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006, Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. Current TV Band Proceeding: Unlicensed use of “white space”, Devices approved by FCC for sharing spectrum without causing “harmful interference” to others, Overlays defining exclu[...]
Talking Points on TV Band White Space Use

Talking Points on TV Band White Space Use

Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006, Pierre de Vries, University of Southern California. Summary, Not either/or choice between L and UL: need to decide best for this specific case.  UL is best for white space junk bands. Mixed L/UL is a necessary regulatory hedge, and in fact synergistic. Not either/or: Don’[...]
What Would a Martian Think?

What Would a Martian Think?

Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006.  Andrew Orlowski, The Register. Technology and Utopias: Media, Copyright, Regulation: Spectrum.  “It's not so much a naïve question of people waiting on mountaintops for Christ to descend from heaven; rather, it's a more micro form of utopianism that operates through a [...]
Municipal Wi-Fi

Municipal Wi-Fi

Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006. Dewayne Hendricks, Dandin Group. Overview, Preamble, Survey of Municipal Wireless, Case Study, Conclusions & Recommendations.  Wi-Fi Arrives, Enables low cost, anywhere, anytime communications, Unlicensed kicks into high gear.  First TAC Meeting, First meeting in 19[...]
Abstracts from Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy

Abstracts from Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy

The following abstracts describe presentations made at Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006: “Why Muni WiFi?”  Coleman Bazelon, Analysis Group.  Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006.  Muni WiFi Business Models: For-Profit; Nonprofit; Procurement; Public-Private Partner[...]
Why Muni WiFi?

Why Muni WiFi?

Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006.  Coleman D. Bazelon, Analysis Group, Inc. Muni WiFi Business Models: For-Profit; Nonprofit; Procurement; Public-Private Partnership; Public Ownership; Subsidized Loans.  Public Benefits: Broadband coverage, Broadband competition, Direct Wholesale, Subsidized broadband, [...]
Empirical Evidence on the Effect of Broadband Regulation

Empirical Evidence on the Effect of Broadband Regulation

Lessons from the Telecom Wars (Mini-Conference September 28, 2006). Thomas W. Hazlett, Director, Information Economy Project and Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. Net Neutrality: Market Evidence.  Assessing the horribles; Business models developed via unregulated transactions; Unregulated transactions now[...]
Net Neutrality: An Issue By Any Other Name

Net Neutrality: An Issue By Any Other Name

Lessons from the Telecom Wars (Mini-Conference September 28, 2006). Paul Misener, Amazon.com. Outline: Pull is Fundamental; Changing Business Model?; Net Neutrality; The Disagreement; Get Paid?; Questions/Discussion. GMUNetNeutralityPresentation.ppt [...]
Telecom Competition and the 1996 Act: Reflecting Back and Looking Forward

Telecom Competition and the 1996 Act: Reflecting Back and Looking Forward

Lessons from the Telecom Wars (Mini-Conference September 28, 2006). Marius Schwartz, Professor of Economics, Georgetown University. This talk: Reflects back on the premises underlying the 1996 Act, its key provisions — especially on network sharing — and the track record. Summarizes briefly some of the lessons and their implications for policy goi[...]
Stepping Stones or Stumbling Blocks? Mandatory Network Sharing in Telecom

Stepping Stones or Stumbling Blocks? Mandatory Network Sharing in Telecom

Lessons from the Telecom Wars (Mini-Conference September 28, 2006). Robert Crandall, Brookings Institution. From “Opening the Monopoly Bottleneck” to the “Stepping Stone Hypothesis”: In many countries, the bottleneck was never a “monopoly” bottleneck, just an expensive one. Unbundling and network sharing are regulatory interventions of last reso[...]
The Spectrum-Allocation Debate: An Analysis

The Spectrum-Allocation Debate: An Analysis

IEEE Internet Computing September/October 2006 (vol. 10 no. 5).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. The standard approach to radio-spectrum allocation in the US posits three alternative models from which regulators choose (on a case-by-case basis) to impose basic rules for coordinating wir[...]
Shedding Tiers for a la Carte? An Economic Analysis of Cable TV Pricing

Shedding Tiers for a la Carte? An Economic Analysis of Cable TV Pricing

5 Journal of Telecommunications and High Technology Law 253-303 (2006).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. A new regulatory debate has sprung up around the pricing of TV networks on cable and satellite systems. Many argue that bundling networks on tiers, rather than selling channels individ[...]
Missed Opportunities in Independent Ink

Missed Opportunities in Independent Ink

Cato Supreme Court Review 333-59 (2005-2006).  Joshua D. Wright, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law. The Supreme Court's opinion in Illinois Tool Works Inc. v. Independent Ink, Inc. rejecting the presumption of market power in antitrust tying cases is unequivocally good for consumers and eminently sensible. The presumption is [...]
Rivalrous Telecommunications Networks With and Without Mandatory Sharing

Rivalrous Telecommunications Networks With and Without Mandatory Sharing

58 Federal Communications Law Journal 477-510 (2006).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. The 1996 Telecommunications Act (“1996 Act”), passed with bipartisan support, aimed to overturn the existing regime of regulated monopoly. Competition would be introduced, and regulation would fade away[...]
Advanced Wireless Technologies and Public Policy

Advanced Wireless Technologies and Public Policy

79 Southern California Law Review 595-665 (2006). Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Matthew L. Spitzer, Robert C. Packard Trustee Chair in Law and Professor of Political Science, University of Southern California Law School. This Article examines tradeoffs in allocating spectrum for exclusi[...]
The Social Value of TV Band Spectrum in European Countries

The Social Value of TV Band Spectrum in European Countries

8 INFO: The journal of policy, regulation and strategy for telecommunications, information and media 62-73 (2006). Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Jüergen Müller, Professor of Economics at Berlin School of Economics, Berlin, Germany, Roberto E. Muñoz, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Pro[...]
FCC License Experiment Design: A 12-Year Experiment

FCC License Experiment Design: A 12-Year Experiment

3 Journal of Law, Economics & Policy 63-80 (2006). David Porter, Donna and David Janes Endowed Chair in Experimental Economics, Chapman University, Vernon L. Smith, Professor of Law and Economics and George L. Argyros Endowed Chair in Finance and Economics, Chapman University School of Law. This short article provides a glimpse at the auction [...]