Radio Spectrum Allocation Policy

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The published research listed below focuses on issues of spectrum allocation. IEP director Dr. Thomas Hazlett is one of the nations leading experts on spectrum policy.

Spectrum Research

Valuing Spectrum Allocations

Valuing Spectrum Allocations

Thomas W. Hazlett, Clemson University Michael Honig, Northwestern University Abstract Observing trends in which Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have become widely popular, some argue that unlicensed allocations hosting such wireless technologies are increasingly valuable and that administrative spectrum allocations should shift accordingly. We challenge t[...]
Herbert Hoover's Radio Malware Turns 90

Herbert Hoover's Radio Malware Turns 90

The Radio Act of 1927 has enjoyed a nice, long life. It's past time for a retirement party. Thomas W. Hazlett | February 24, 2017 On February 23, 1927, Babe Ruth had still to hit 60 home runs in a season. Yet President Calvin Coolidge would that day sign a bill that would establish how radio spectrum—the "economic oxygen" of the emerging in[...]
The Hill: Patients dying because of FDA inflexibility

The Hill: Patients dying because of FDA inflexibility

Patients dying because of FDA inflexibility By Thomas W. Hazlett - 05/25/16 05:08 PM EDT via The Hill   On May 26, the Food and Drug Administration will decide whether to approve eteplirsen, a therapy for Duchenne multiple dystrophy (DMD), on a fast-track basis. The drug, made by Sarepta Therapeutics, is the first for this br[...]
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What principles of governance does spectrum policy need?

What lessons can be learned for spectrum policy from the management of other natural resources? Here, an expert on resource management says good governance depends on a transparent, rules-based approach that will minimise regulatory uncertainty. This stability is key to encouraging the necessary investment in networks. Read the full research her[...]
Hazlett on The Rationality of U.S. Regulation of the Broadcast Spectrum in the 1934 Communications Act

Hazlett on The Rationality of U.S. Regulation of the Broadcast Spectrum in the 1934 Communications Act

On the 80th anniversary of the Communications Act, the November 2014 issue of The Review of Industrial Organization looks back at the landmark legislation and ahead to the future of broadcast regulation. The journal features an article by Thomas W. Hazlett, "The Rationality of U.S. Regulation of the Broadcast Spectrum in the 1934 Communications Act[...]
Efficient Spectrum Reallocation with Hold-Ups and Without Nirvana

Efficient Spectrum Reallocation with Hold-Ups and Without Nirvana

Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law and Economics and Director, Information Economy Project, George Mason University and Clemson University In 2010, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) determined that up to 20 television channels should be shifted to mobile services. If successful, the reform could generate over $1 trillion in soc[...]
Federalist Society's Engage Magazine: Hazlett Weighs in on Spectrum Crisis

Federalist Society's Engage Magazine: Hazlett Weighs in on Spectrum Crisis

The wireless industry has been one of the brightest spots in what has been a relatively stagnant post-recession economy. Yet, industry observers have noted that the diminishing availability of radio spectrum has hampered potential growth in the mobile sector. Moreover, the spectrum shortage is predicted to only worsen with increased demand for mobi[...]
Skorup on the Efficient Use of Federal Spectrum

Skorup on the Efficient Use of Federal Spectrum

IEP's Brent Skorup has recently published a paper through George Mason's Mercatus Center that examines proposals for reallocating spectrum held by the federal government for use in mobile broadband networks. Considering the quickly increasing popularity of mobile broadband services, the efficient transfer of spectrum to the private market has wide [...]
Hazlett and Skorup on LightSquared and Spectrum Rights

Hazlett and Skorup on LightSquared and Spectrum Rights

IEP's Thomas Hazlett and Brent Skorup recently completed a new research piece, Tragedy of the Regulatory Commons: LightSquared and the Missing Spectrum Rights. The Duke Law & Technology Review will publish the article later this year. Hazlett and Skorup describe how the FCC's rights assignment process caused the GPS-LightSquared conflict, resulting[...]
The Law and Economics of Network Neutrality

The Law and Economics of Network Neutrality

Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law and Economics and Director, Information Economy Project, George Mason University Joshua D. Wright, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law and Department of Economics Indiana Law Review, Vol. 45 (2012). This Paper critiques the FCC's net neutrality (NN) policy—specifically, the no blocking[...]
Exactitude in Defining Rights: Radio Spectrum and the 'Harmful Interference' Conundrum

Exactitude in Defining Rights: Radio Spectrum and the 'Harmful Interference' Conundrum

Berkeley Technology Law Journal Vol. 28, 2013, George Mason Law & Economics Research Paper No. 12-55.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Sarah Oh, Research Fellow, Information Economy Project, and Ph.D. Student, George Mason University Department of Economics. In the century since the R[...]
What Really Matters in Spectrum Allocation Design

What Really Matters in Spectrum Allocation Design

10 Nw. J. Tech. & Intell. Prop. 93 (2012). Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Roberto E. Muñoz, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Project and Professor, Federico, Santa María Technical University, Santiago, Chile, Diego Avanzini, Visiting Scholar, Information Economy Project. [...]
The Case for Liberal Spectrum Licenses: A Technical and Economic Perspective

The Case for Liberal Spectrum Licenses: A Technical and Economic Perspective

26 Berkeley Tech. L.J. 1037 (2011). Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Evan T. Leo, Partner, Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel, P.L.L.C. The traditional system of radio spectrum allocation has inefficiently restricted wireless services. Alternatively, liberal licenses ceding de[...]
Exclusion Principles and Receiver Boundaries on Spectrum Resources

Exclusion Principles and Receiver Boundaries on Spectrum Resources

39th Annual TPRC (2011).  Sarah Oh, Operations and Research Director of the Information Economy Project at George Mason University School of Law. This article will discuss exclusion principles for old receivers that occupy spectrum resources. Asymmetric interference in old receivers and the costs of receiver design are two key factors in the analy[...]
The Wasteland: Anticommons, White Spaces, and the Fallacy of Spectrum

The Wasteland: Anticommons, White Spaces, and the Fallacy of Spectrum

53 Ariz. L. Rev. 213 (2011). Kevin Werbach, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Associate Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics. “I urge you, I urge you to put the people's airwaves to the service of the people and the cause of freedom. You must help prepare a generation for great decisions. You must help a great natio[...]
Tragedy T.V.: Rights Fragmentation and the Junk Band Problem

Tragedy T.V.: Rights Fragmentation and the Junk Band Problem

53 Ariz. L. Rev. 83 (2011).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Director, Information Economy Project, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law Tragedy of the anticommons occurs when property rules fail to enable efficient social coordination. In radio spectrum, rights issued to airwave users have traditionally been severely[...]
Radio Spectrum and the Disruptive Clarity of Ronald Coase

Radio Spectrum and the Disruptive Clarity of Ronald Coase

Coase Conference: Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase, University of Chicago Law School. Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, David Porter, Donna and David Janes Endowed Chair in Experimental Economics, Chapman University, Vernon L. Smith, Profe[...]
Has "Unlicensed" in Part 15 Worked? A Case Study

Has "Unlicensed" in Part 15 Worked? A Case Study

INFO, Special Issue August 2009, INFO Volume 11, Issue 5.  Tim Pozar, TM Pozar Telecommunications Engineering, Mill Valley, California. The Federal Communications Commission established the provisions for unlicensed operations of intentional radiators or transmitters for commutations in what was called the industrial scientific and medical bands[...]
A Welfare Analysis of Spectrum Allocation Policies

A Welfare Analysis of Spectrum Allocation Policies

40 RAND Journal of Economics 424–54, Autumn 2009.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Roberto E. Muñoz, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Project and Professor, Federico Santa María Technical University, Santiago, Chile. Economic analysis of spectrum policy focuses on government revenues de[...]
Spectrum Allocation in Latin America: An Economic Analysis

Spectrum Allocation in Latin America: An Economic Analysis

21 Information Economics & Policy 261-78 (2009). Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Roberto E. Muñoz, Senior Fellow, Information Economy Project and Professor, Federico Santa María Technical University, Santiago, Chile. As elsewhere, wireless markets play a crucial role in Latin Americ[...]
Optimal Abolition of FCC Spectrum Allocation

Optimal Abolition of FCC Spectrum Allocation

22 Journal of Economic Perspectives 103-28 (Winter 2008).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. Ronald Coase based his 1959 call for spectrum markets on theoretical conjecture. Today abundant evidence supports his case. Targeted liberalization in cellular markets, as contrasted with regulatory[...]
Can Wireless Infrastructure Keep Up In Ultra Broadband? Gigabits vs. Megahertz

Can Wireless Infrastructure Keep Up In Ultra Broadband? Gigabits vs. Megahertz

Presentation, CITI 25th Anniversary International Summit on Media & Communication 2008.  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. Overview: (1) Yes, It will take Liberal Licenses; broad, exclusive spectrum rights productive; more bandwidth; overlays for reallocations; mobile voice now dominati[...]
Part 4 - A Rejoinder to Weiser and Hatfield on Spectrum Rights

Part 4 - A Rejoinder to Weiser and Hatfield on Spectrum Rights

15 George Mason Law Review 1031-39 (June 2008).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. "The current spectrum regulatory system generates an enormous volume of verbiage but precious little analysis. This makes the probing and provocative discussion initiated by Professors Phil Weiser and Dale Ha[...]
Part 2 - A Law & Economics Approach to Spectrum Property Rights: A Response to Professors Weiser & Hatfield

Part 2 - A Law & Economics Approach to Spectrum Property Rights: A Response to Professors Weiser & Hatfield

15 George Mason Law Review 975-1023 (June 2008).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. "The provocative article by Phil Weiser and Dale Hatfield presents a challenging analysis of property rights to radio spectrum. Its main thesis is that a property system, by which they mean a private propert[...]
Part 3 - Property Rights in Spectrum: A Reply to Hazlett

Part 3 - Property Rights in Spectrum: A Reply to Hazlett

15 Geo. Mason Law Review 1025 (2008).  Philip J. Weiser, Professor of Law and Telecommunications at the University of Colorado, Dale Hatfield is an Adjunct Professor of Telecommunications at the University of Colorado. "As the many citations to his prior work in our article, Spectrum Policy Reform and the Next Frontier of Property Rights, indicate[...]
Part 1 - Spectrum Policy Reform and the Next Frontier of Property Rights

Part 1 - Spectrum Policy Reform and the Next Frontier of Property Rights

15 Geo. Mason Law Review 549 (2008).  Philip J. Weiser, Professor of Law and Telecommunications at the University of Colorado, Dale Hatfield is an Adjunct Professor of Telecommunications at the University of Colorado. "Wireless spectrum is hot property. In early 2008, a number of firms bid almost $20 billion for the right to use 62 megahertz of sp[...]
Property Rights to Radio Spectrum in Guatemala and El Salvador: An Experiment in Liberalization

Property Rights to Radio Spectrum in Guatemala and El Salvador: An Experiment in Liberalization

3 Review of Law & Economics 437-484 (2007).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law, Giancarlo Ibarguen, Universidad Francisco Marroquin, Wayne A. Leighton, Senior Expert at Navigant Economics LLC, Adjunct Professor, U.S. liaison with Francisco Marroquín University in Guatemala. In most cou[...]
Personal Communications and Spectrum Policy For the 21st Century

Personal Communications and Spectrum Policy For the 21st Century

31 Telecommunications Policy 566-72 (Nov.-Dec. 2007). Martin Cooper, CEO, Arraycomm & “Father of the Cellphone”, Tullock Lecturer February 2007. People are mobile! They are naturally, inherently mobile. You see that every time you drive the streets of the District and the beltway. It seems that few people are where they want to be and they all[...]
The Spectrum Commons in Theory and Practice

The Spectrum Commons in Theory and Practice

2007 Stanford Technology Law Review 1 (2007).  Jerry Brito, Senior Research Fellow, Mercatus Center. The radio spectrum is a scarce resource that has been historically allocated through command-and-control regulation. Today, it is widely accepted that this type of allocation is as inefficient for spectrum as it would be for paper or land. Many com[...]
Keynote Address, Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy

Keynote Address, Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy

Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006. Irwin Mark Jacobs, Chairman of the Board, Qualcomm. LINKABIT – Founded October, 1968, QUALCOMM - Founded July 1, 1985. For Both Companies - No Products at Start. Strategy - Innovation: Digital & Wireless Communications & Applications. November 1989 - First[...]
Abstracts from Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy

Abstracts from Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy

The following abstracts describe presentations made at Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006: “Why Muni WiFi?”  Coleman Bazelon, Analysis Group.  Innovation, Technology, and Spectrum Policy, Mini-Conference, Nov. 14, 2006.  Muni WiFi Business Models: For-Profit; Nonprofit; Procurement; Public-Private Partner[...]
The Spectrum-Allocation Debate: An Analysis

The Spectrum-Allocation Debate: An Analysis

IEEE Internet Computing September/October 2006 (vol. 10 no. 5).  Thomas W. Hazlett, Professor of Law & Economics, George Mason University School of Law. The standard approach to radio-spectrum allocation in the US posits three alternative models from which regulators choose (on a case-by-case basis) to impose basic rules for coordinating wir[...]