Op-eds

Spectrum Research

The Wall Street Journal: How Politics Stalls Wireless Innovation

The Wall Street Journal: How Politics Stalls Wireless Innovation

The FCC unveiled its National Broadband Plan in 2010—but couldn't stick to it. Thomas W. Hazlett October 1, 2017 The Federal Communications Commission received a homework assignment in 2009—and an extra $13 million for school supplies. Congress ordered the agency to write a "National Broadband Plan" to stimulate the economy. The report, [...]
FCC “Incentive Auction” marks progress and pitfalls towards freeing wireless spectrum

FCC “Incentive Auction” marks progress and pitfalls towards freeing wireless spectrum

          Thomas W. Hazlett Wednesday, May 24, 2017 In February 2009 the Federal Communications Commission began to draft a National Broadband Plan (NBP). Published in March 2010, the study asked how policymakers might improve broadband in the U.S. The answer: use innovative market mechanisms to [...]
United Airlines' 'Re-Accommodation' Could Have So Easily Been Avoided

United Airlines' 'Re-Accommodation' Could Have So Easily Been Avoided

      By Thomas Hazlett May 23, 2017 United’s passenger “re-accommodation” debacle was so easy to avoid. An auction would discover which passengers would be eager to step aside.  United did dangle $800 in flight credits for seats, but that price was wrong. Bidding was curiously halted.  And then United decided to acq[...]
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From FM to the Smartphone: The Evolution of Radio Media

May 10, 2017 in Radio, Technology Thomas Hazlett— The Age of Wireless has triggered excitement, disruption, and challenge. Debates rage on about the value of social media, how to deal with the threat of cyber hacking, and the regulation of emerging networks. But beneath it all lies a hardened policy structure that doles out radio spectrum [...]
Herbert Hoover's Radio Malware Turns 90

Herbert Hoover's Radio Malware Turns 90

The Radio Act of 1927 has enjoyed a nice, long life. It's past time for a retirement party. Thomas W. Hazlett | February 24, 2017 On February 23, 1927, Babe Ruth had still to hit 60 home runs in a season. Yet President Calvin Coolidge would that day sign a bill that would establish how radio spectrum—the "economic oxygen" of the emerging in[...]
Obama's misguided plan to connect schools to the Internet

Obama's misguided plan to connect schools to the Internet

My new research shows that more Internet access funding doesn't help students. And almost all U.S. schools are already online. By Thomas Hazlett 08/23/16 09:27 AM EDT Even during times of political gridlock, connecting schools to the Internet has always received bipartisan support. Politicians ranging from Bill Clinton to Newt Gingrich h[...]
Time for the Supremes to Decide 'Net Neutrality'

Time for the Supremes to Decide 'Net Neutrality'

Time for the Supremes to Decide 'Net Neutrality' By Thomas Hazlett & Joshua Wright The FCC's dramatic 2015 pivot on Internet regulation sought to envelope advanced broadband networks in the shroud of telephone company rules rolled out in the Mann Elkins Act of 1910. These historic common carriage "Title II" regulations - originally the pr[...]
Data-Driven Modernization of E-rate for Wi-Fi in Schools

Data-Driven Modernization of E-rate for Wi-Fi in Schools

By: Sarah Oh Around the time of the modernization order of the E-rate program in 2014, I published an empirical study[1] on distribution effects of program rules between 1998 and 2012.  I found that the old rules, particularly the discount rate matrix, had distribution effects that perhaps needed reform.  Since the Universal Service Administrati[...]
Hazlett on The Rationality of U.S. Regulation of the Broadcast Spectrum in the 1934 Communications Act

Hazlett on The Rationality of U.S. Regulation of the Broadcast Spectrum in the 1934 Communications Act

On the 80th anniversary of the Communications Act, the November 2014 issue of The Review of Industrial Organization looks back at the landmark legislation and ahead to the future of broadcast regulation. The journal features an article by Thomas W. Hazlett, "The Rationality of U.S. Regulation of the Broadcast Spectrum in the 1934 Communications Act[...]
Skorup Op-Ed on Net Neutrality Appears in Real Clear Markets

Skorup Op-Ed on Net Neutrality Appears in Real Clear Markets

IEP Scholar Brent Skorup penned an op-ed on the net neutrality debate. In it, he examines the origins of net neutrality, specifically the first violator of the FCC's net neutrality rules. The FCC forced a small wireless carrier to abandon their two tier pricing scheme that was offered to their customers as a means to offer a more basic service for [...]
Skorup and Thierer Op-ed on Cronyism Published by US News and World Report

Skorup and Thierer Op-ed on Cronyism Published by US News and World Report

IEP's Brent Skorup, along with co-author Adam Thierer of the Mercatus Center, published an op-ed in US News and World Report, detailing the threats posed by increased cronyism in the IT sector. The op-ed, featured in the Economic Intelligence Blog, details specific harms caused by cronyism while also posing solutions designed to alleviate this issu[...]
Skorup Op-ed on Spectrum Crisis Appears in The Hill

Skorup Op-ed on Spectrum Crisis Appears in The Hill

IEP's Brent Skorup recently had an op-ed piece published by the leading political newspaper The Hill. In the op-ed, entitled "The Spectrum Crisis is Upon Us," Skorup identifies the excessive allocation of spectrum to federal government agencies, where such spectrum has been not used efficiently, as contributing to the current "spectrum crunch." Sko[...]
Wall Street Journal: Thomas Hazlett: The iPhone Turns Five

Wall Street Journal: Thomas Hazlett: The iPhone Turns Five

Forget the shouting about 'open' or 'closed' systems. The magic is in the dynamics of platform competition. On June 29, 2007, thousands of fan-boys and -girls camped in long lines to inhale a wisp of sweet techno fairy dust. The new iPhone rocked the world. Revolutionary in design, function and ecosystem, it set off the mobile data tsunami. In thre[...]
Barron's: Gravitational Shift in Wireless, Thomas Hazlett

Barron's: Gravitational Shift in Wireless, Thomas Hazlett

Competition in mobile phones has supplanted competition among networks.  In August 2011, Sprint Nextel jubilantly announced that it would offer the iPhone 4 on its network. This was supposed to be good news, for Apple lovers would surge onto Sprint's network and pay monthly fees for access. But Sprint's share price tanked 10% on the announcement.  [...]
Washington Post: We Are the Media, and So Are You, Jimmy Wales and Kat Walsh

Washington Post: We Are the Media, and So Are You, Jimmy Wales and Kat Walsh

Opinions, By Jimmy Wales and Kat Walsh, Published: February 9.  Jimmy Wales, the founder of Wikipedia, and Kat Walsh are members of the Wikimedia Foundation board of trustees.  It’s easy to frame the fight over SOPA and PIPA as Hollywood vs. Silicon Valley — two huge industries clashing over whose voice should dictate the future of Internet policy [...]
[Amazon] Thomas Hazlett, "The Fallacy of Net Neutrality"

[Amazon] Thomas Hazlett, "The Fallacy of Net Neutrality"

Book Description Publication Date: November 1, 2011 | Series: Encounter Broadsides (Book 23). “There is little dispute that the Internet should continue as an open platform,” notes the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. Yet, in a curious twist of logic, the agency has moved to discontinue the legal regime successfully yielding that magnificent[...]
Financial Times: Googling 'Innovation', Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Googling 'Innovation', Thomas Hazlett

President Barack Obama has announced a new government initiative to promote economic innovation. In other news, the Federal Trade Commission has launched an antitrust investigation into the practices of Silicon Valley’s uber-innovator, Google. Note to the administration: If you want to promote innovation, stop prosecuting it. Full article available[...]
The Hill: Television for the 21st Century, Thomas Hazlett

The Hill: Television for the 21st Century, Thomas Hazlett

Eyes were wide when television was unveiled at the 1939 World’s Fair. Incredulous onlookers were so suspicious of the technology that a glass TV set had to be constructed, an attempt to convince skeptics that the product was not a hoax. But the awestruck were right to be wary. Social upheaval was soon to follow.  Full article available at thehill.c[...]
Politico: If a TV Station Falls in the Forest, Thomas Hazlett

Politico: If a TV Station Falls in the Forest, Thomas Hazlett

George Mason law and economics professor Thomas W. Hazlett argues that it’s time for the old kings of the airwaves to make way for the new. BROADCASTING SHOWS ITS AGE — And should no longer be propped up, says a former FCC chief economist in a paper to be released today. In “If a TV Station Falls in the Forrest...” George Mason law and economics pr[...]
Financial Times: FCC Net Neutrality Rules and Efficiency, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: FCC Net Neutrality Rules and Efficiency, Thomas Hazlett

The US Federal Communications Commission, seeing the internet as a fragile ecosystem under threat from opportunistic internet service providers, issued its “network neutrality” order on December 23. By January 10 it had received its first complaint - against an upstart wireless competitor providing innovative services, advanced technologies and new[...]
Financial Times: Fred Kahn’s First-Class Flight, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Fred Kahn’s First-Class Flight, Thomas Hazlett

This week’s passing of economist Alfred Kahn, 93, has brought tributes for the Cornell professor’s key role in the 1970s deregulation of US airline fares. That achievement saves Americans a stunning $20bn annually. Yet Kahn’s contributions to electricity regulation and telecommunications policy may even exceed this high-flying success. Thanks to a [...]
Financial Times: Shooting Blanks on Wireless Policy, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Shooting Blanks on Wireless Policy, Thomas Hazlett

US regulators are designating that unused TV channels be made available for low-power wireless devices. The move – pushed by tech giants Microsoft, Google, HP, and Dell -- is hailed as “liberalisation”, paving the way for “Wi-Fi on steroids.” The exact same hype, including a similar “licence-exempt” plan, inspired a 2005 bandwidth set-aside for WiM[...]
Financial Times: Is Google More Open Than Apple?, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Is Google More Open Than Apple?, Thomas Hazlett

Google’s Android has blasted off. In the first quarter of 2010, it blew by Apple iPhone’s 21 percent market share, accounting for 28 per cent of all smart phones sold in the US according to industry consultancy NDP. And its momentum appears unstoppable. Analysts predict that it will soon roar past Research in Motion (Blackberry), now at 36 per cent[...]
Barron's: Putting Economics Above Ideology, Thomas Hazlett

Barron's: Putting Economics Above Ideology, Thomas Hazlett

In early 2001, the Bush administration halted plans to make more radio spectrum available for cellphone and other mobile services. Officials believed delaying new license auctions would result in higher prices. And sales delayed until 2006 and 2008 did indeed generate record proceeds - $33 billion. But the lollygagging cost the U.S. economy much mo[...]
Financial Times: Net Neutrality: Time for Evidence-Based Policy, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Net Neutrality: Time for Evidence-Based Policy, Thomas Hazlett

A federal appeals court has bopped the Federal Communications Commission yet again. In Comcast v. FCC – the “network neutrality” case - the agency was found to be making up the law as it went. In sanctioning the cable operator for broadband network management it found dubious, the Bush-era FCC exceeded its charter. Cable modem services and digital [...]
Financial Times: Google's China Syndrome, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Google's China Syndrome, Thomas Hazlett

Traditionally, the local bank engaged in a "trust relationship." It promised to invest your savings wisely, taking only the most prudent risks. To convince you of its sincerity, it spent a lot on a fancy building, telling customers: we're no "fly by night" operation. It sponsored the Little League team and the Girl Scouts, spreading community roots[...]
Financial Times: Ronald Coase and the Radio Spectrum, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Ronald Coase and the Radio Spectrum, Thomas Hazlett

At the University of Chicago recently, an illustrious group of scholars convened to celebrate the life and writings of Nobel Laureate Ronald Coase. It was precisely fifty years ago that Coase, a Brit-turned-American economist who had spent a decade studying the British Broadcasting Corporation and the Federal Communications Commission, wrote an ess[...]
Commentary Magazine: We're Number Two?, Thomas Hazlett

Commentary Magazine: We're Number Two?, Thomas Hazlett

At a swanky American resort in the summer of 2008, an elite policy discussion was underway, and the message could not have been more stark. The U.S. has fallen behind in the global broadband race and is now falling further behind. We are sinking to Third World status. Surely, the government must act.  Full article available for download here.  Go t[...]
TVNewsCheck: Putting A Price Tag On TV Spectrum, Thomas Hazlett

TVNewsCheck: Putting A Price Tag On TV Spectrum, Thomas Hazlett

Guest Commentary by Tom Hazlett. The former chief economist of the FCC says that TV broadcasters are sitting on a valuable chunk of spectrum and he spells out some options that would let broadcasters use those airwaves for new services while not destroying free TV. The free TV service remains, but the delivery platform will be technology-neutral. A[...]
Financial Times: The Broadband Numbers Racket, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: The Broadband Numbers Racket, Thomas Hazlett

The global broadband race is on, and the crowd has turned on Team USA In 2004, President George W. Bush said, with characteristic rounding error: "Tenth is ten spots too low". Things worsened. Last December, President Barack Obama warned that "It is unacceptable that the United States ranks 15th in the world in broadband adoption". Things worsened [...]
BusinessWeek: The Misguided Urge to Regulate Wireless, Thomas Hazlett

BusinessWeek: The Misguided Urge to Regulate Wireless, Thomas Hazlett

If innovation- and competition-spurring iPhones and BlackBerrys are seen as a problem, regulators in Washington are asking the wrong questions.  Go to full article at Bloomberg BusinessWeek.com.  http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/jul2009/tc20090727_289094.htm.   [...]
RealClearMarkets.com: Analog Television Dies With a Whimper, Thomas Hazlett

RealClearMarkets.com: Analog Television Dies With a Whimper, Thomas Hazlett

On June 12th, a potential cataclysm passed quietly into the ether. All U.S. analog TV stations were turned off. Despite fears on Capitol Hill and at the Federal Communications Commission that millions of hysterical Aunt Minnies would go screaming into the streets to protest the disappearance of Wheel of Fortune, nary a peep was heard. The widely fe[...]
Financial Times: A Letter to the New FCC Chair, Mr. Julius Genachowski, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: A Letter to the New FCC Chair, Mr. Julius Genachowski, Thomas Hazlett

Dear Mr. Julius Genachowski, Welcome to Washington. Now that you’re chairing a very powerful agency, you’ll hear a great many schemes to fatten this interest group or that company. Turn a deaf ear, my friend. Except now. This one will enrich the US economy, 300m wireless customers, and me. But it will make you famous. It would be the most innovativ[...]
Forbes Magazine: U.S. Antitrust Becomes More European, Joshua Wright

Forbes Magazine: U.S. Antitrust Becomes More European, Joshua Wright

Last week the European Commission slapped Intel Corporation with the largest antitrust fine in the Commission's history, announcing that the sanctions were necessary to protect consumers from the egregious abuses of a "dominant firm." What did Intel do to merit this sanction? Whatever its intentions were, its actions leading up to the fine resulted[...]
Financial Times: Shovel-Ready Broadband Stimulus, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Shovel-Ready Broadband Stimulus, Thomas Hazlett

Plagued with the sharpest economic downturn in a generation, US policy makers scrolled through a series of emergency deficit-enhancement measures in 2008-09. The third and final such effort was enacted in February. At $800bn, it set a new standard for government red ink: 12 per cent of 2009 GDP - twice the previous post-World War II high. Full arti[...]
Financial Times: Analog Switchoff Goes Unnoticed, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Analog Switchoff Goes Unnoticed, Thomas Hazlett

600 American TV stations have gone dark. No one cares. On Wednesday, Feb. 18, hundreds of US TV stations turned off their analog signals. Scarcely a soul noticed. The event - one that policy makers have quivered in fear of for 23 years - was a yawn. When, in 1986, cell-phone makers and public safety agencies asked the Federal Communications Commiss[...]
Ars Technica: Muni WiFi Flop a Bad Omen for FCC's Free Wireless Plan, Thomas Hazlett

Ars Technica: Muni WiFi Flop a Bad Omen for FCC's Free Wireless Plan, Thomas Hazlett

Philadelphia shook loose of its rust-belt image to make 2004 headlines for its visionary wireless broadband network. "Municipal WiFi" - using free, unlicensed airwaves and cheap, off-the-shelf radios - would cost taxpayers nothing. Private companies, given exclusive rights and specific social obligations, would hang those radios from street lights,[...]
Financial Times: The Anti-Technology Bail-Out, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: The Anti-Technology Bail-Out, Thomas Hazlett

With Detroit's auto-makers flat on their financial backs, GM, Ford and Chrysler are begging for at least $25bn in public subsidies. They hold 250,000 auto workers - and, implicitly, the US economy - hostage. The ransom note reads: send us the money or unemployment will soar, consumer markets will tank and millions will lose.  Full article available[...]
Barron's: Economies of Scale: The "Don't Be Evil" Principle Permits Profits, Thomas Hazlett

Barron's: Economies of Scale: The "Don't Be Evil" Principle Permits Profits, Thomas Hazlett

Editorial Commentary By Thomas W. Hazlett | The "Don't Be Evil" principle permits profits. It's amazing what turns up when you Google almost anything -- especially Google: The Internet application has become a corporation to be reckoned with. Founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin changed Web search by ranking pages according to their popularity, not [...]
Ars Technica: Transition to Yesterday: Subsidizing the Killer App of 1952, Thomas Hazlett

Ars Technica: Transition to Yesterday: Subsidizing the Killer App of 1952, Thomas Hazlett

Editor's note: the vote for a new president isn't the only one to take place on Tuesday. In Washington, DC, the Federal Communications Commission will weigh in on a proposal to open up the so-called "white spaces" in the digital TV spectrum for use by wireless broadband applications after the end of most analog TV transmissions next February. In th[...]
Wall Street Journal: Don't Let Google Freeze the Airwaves, Thomas Hazlett and Vernon Smith, Oct. 3, 2008.

Wall Street Journal: Don't Let Google Freeze the Airwaves, Thomas Hazlett and Vernon Smith, Oct. 3, 2008.

Don't Let Google Freeze the Airwaves, a scheme to keep precious spectrum underutilized. Google is now pushing a "free the airwaves" campaign, rallying to open TV band frequencies for new wireless services. This is a superb idea, one suggested by South Dakota Republican Sen. Larry Pressler in 1996, just before he was targeted by broadcasters and def[...]
Financial Times: FCC Should Leave Net Neutrality to Anti-Trust Courts, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: FCC Should Leave Net Neutrality to Anti-Trust Courts, Thomas Hazlett

US regulators have dropped the net neutrality bomb on Comcast, the country's largest cable operator that supplies broadband service to14.4m households. The Federal Communications Commission ruled in August that the firm had secretly throttled certain "peer-to-peer" applications, such as Bit Torrent, that gobble bandwidth. The motive for the scheme,[...]
Financial Times: On a Clearwire, You Can See Everything, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: On a Clearwire, You Can See Everything, Thomas Hazlett

In May, mobile carrier Sprint entered a venture with wireless broadband start-up Clearwire and a corporate cadre that includes Google and cable operators Comcast, Time Warner and Bright House. They joined previous investors Intel, Motorola, Bell Canada, cellular billionaire Craig McCaw and share buyers in Clearwire's 2007 initial public offering to[...]
Financial Times: Google, Yahoo, Microsoft: Antitrust Confusion, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Google, Yahoo, Microsoft: Antitrust Confusion, Thomas Hazlett

Financial markets are abuzz with the possibility of a Microsoft-Yahoo merger or a Google-Yahoo to block it. A heavy dose of the chatter is consumed by the regulatory implications of either: will the antitrust agencies in the US and European Union approve the transaction? The deals pivot on such anticipations. Of course, antitrust laws are meant to [...]
Financial Times: It's the Spectrum, Stupid, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: It's the Spectrum, Stupid, Thomas Hazlett

The US's "700 MHz auction" recently closed with some $19.6bn in winning bids. But the dollars flowing to the Treasury are tantamount to loose change. The real payoff is that the chunk of prime spectrum made available will fuel-inject the wireless turbines of the information economy. Mobile US subscribers enjoy annual benefits of at least $150bn. Th[...]
Financial Times: US v. Microsoft: Who Really Won?, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: US v. Microsoft: Who Really Won?, Thomas Hazlett

Before he became Mother Teresa, Bill Gates was Darth Vader. As captain of the Evil Empire, he and his minions dominated PC operating systems, vanquishing all rivals. In May of 1998, the US Department of Justice struck back. In the "antitrust case of the century," the DoJ accused the Microsoft Corporation of monopolisation. The company was accused o[...]
Financial Times: Helping Young Minds Click, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Helping Young Minds Click, Thomas Hazlett

The $100 laptop for kids is here. And the good news is that it sells for just $200. That is close enough for charitable work and MIT's Nicholas Negroponte ought be toasted. His ambitious plan to distribute millions of light, energy-conscious notebook computers to children in developing countries - One Laptop Per Child, or OLPC - is already brighten[...]
Financial Times: How the 'Walled Garden' Promotes Innovation, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: How the 'Walled Garden' Promotes Innovation, Thomas Hazlett

An intense iPhone buzz sent a high-pitched signal to Apple fanatics early this summer in the US. They hurled themselves into AT&T sales offices and are still giggly with technophile delight. The means by which Apple a computer products company without wireless assets launched the mobile phone of the century illustrates how markets introduce inn[...]
Wall Street Journal: The Return of the Speech Police, Dennis R. Patrick & Thomas W. Hazlett

Wall Street Journal: The Return of the Speech Police, Dennis R. Patrick & Thomas W. Hazlett

Government regulation of broadcast speech clashes with the First Amendment. This is why 20 years ago the Federal Communications Commission voted 4-0 to abolish the so-called Fairness Doctrine, a rule that required broadcasters to cover "controversial issues of public importance" and to afford reasonable opportunities for the presentation of "contra[...]
Financial Times: Bandwidth Wars, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Bandwidth Wars, Thomas Hazlett

The vaunted digital television transition is under way. It offers to upgrade broadcast television picture quality. But high definition is mostly window-dressing. Indeed, television advertisers will not pay broadcasters much more for HD audiences, either because viewers watch on sets too small to notice it or because big-screen users subscribe to ca[...]
Financial Times: Google's Algorithm of Life: Rejoice and Be Wary, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Google's Algorithm of Life: Rejoice and Be Wary, Thomas Hazlett

Tomorrow just arrived and it is about time. How many George Orwell novels or Ray Bradbury stories has it taken us? At long last, we may soon be able to click on the electronic screen to find out what is in our heads. Full article available at FT.com.  http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/30ab9636-0961-11dc-a349-000b5df10621.html.  Also available by [PDF Downl[...]
Financial Times: Content is King but the Monarch has Fled, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Content is King but the Monarch has Fled, Thomas Hazlett

From time to time, a friendly skirmish arises in which media experts divvy up sides to debate the assertion, “content is king.” That content and delivery platforms are complementary assets whose values tend to rise or fall in tandem is courteously set aside. This argument is about grabbing shares on the media revenue pie chart. Full article availab[...]
Wall Street Journal: Failure to Communicate, Jerry Brito

Wall Street Journal: Failure to Communicate, Jerry Brito

For more than two decades, the nation's first responders to emergencies have had to contend with radio communications that were not up to the task. Each time a major calamity such as the Oklahoma City bombing, 9/11 or Hurricane Katrina throws a spotlight on the problem, a blue-ribbon panel is convened. And each time the panel invariably offers the [...]
Financial Times: The Global Village and the Madness of e-Crowds, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: The Global Village and the Madness of e-Crowds, Thomas Hazlett

Today’s buzz is You, whom Time Magazine honoured as “Person of the Year” for igniting “community and collaboration on a scale never seen before.” Your blog entries and social networking posts rock. Meanwhile, you’re revolutionising Information Technology markets with far-flung innovations in open-source hardware and software. Soon governments will [...]
Baltimore Sun: Phone Fund Rip-off, Thomas Hazlett

Baltimore Sun: Phone Fund Rip-off, Thomas Hazlett

Programs are given funny names in Washington. Take the Universal Service Fund, which spends $7 billion annually to extend telephone service to low-income households in high-cost areas. In truth, it has never delivered "universal" phone service or significantly expanded the reach of networks. What it does is shower subsidies on grossly inefficient r[...]
Financial Times: Google and the Myth of an Open Net, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Google and the Myth of an Open Net, Thomas Hazlett

The news that YouTube has pocketed $1.65bn in Google gold has stirred the technology industry and pushed yet another wave of computer savvy twenty-somethings to all-night madness in the race for the next cool thing. Business aspects of this exciting match – which would itself resemble a hook-up on a social networking site, were it not for the 10-di[...]
Financial Times: A Web Bubble Blown Out of Proportion, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: A Web Bubble Blown Out of Proportion, Thomas Hazlett

The economist Paul Samuelson likes to joke that Wall Street indices predicted nine out of the last five recessions. So too in the new economy, where the fruits of success are often hailed as harbingers of doom.  Full article available at FT.com.  http://www.ft.com/cms/d8e292c8-5345-11db-99c5-0000779e2340.html.  Also available, a PDF Download on Pro[...]
Barron’s: Everything’s on the Menu, Thomas Hazlett

Barron’s: Everything’s on the Menu, Thomas Hazlett

Cheaper by the bundle.  A la carte cable TV doesn't serve consumers best. Just use your remote to choose… The grocery store doesn't require you to buy a case of beer each time you pick up a loaf of bread, so why should you be forced to take MTV and Spike when all you really want to watch is Disney, Discovery and Fox News? The standard cable TV serv[...]
Wall Street Journal: Germany's Cable Problem, Thomas Hazlett

Wall Street Journal: Germany's Cable Problem, Thomas Hazlett

EU telecommunications regulators have won a battle, as German authorities will impose stricter mandates on their country's (mostly) privatized phone giant, Deutsche Telekom. Following a European Commission ruling last week, DT will be required to lease its high-speed data lines to rivals on more generous terms, an effort designed to invigorate reta[...]
Wall Street Journal: Broadbandits, Thomas Hazlett

Wall Street Journal: Broadbandits, Thomas Hazlett

We should be celebrating an anniversary this month: One year ago, in August, the Federal Communications Commission voted to deregulate residential broadband services. Never heard of it? Well, I'm not proposing a parade; but this victory for freer markets undermines the current proposal to re-regulate the Internet via "net neutrality." First, the br[...]
Financial Times: Antitrust Regulators Must Listen to Reason, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Antitrust Regulators Must Listen to Reason, Thomas Hazlett

When Apple’s iTunes rocked our planet with its 2003 blast-off, it triggered near-instantaneous iPod adoption by a generation of audio thrill-seekers and revived the company that delivered us into the age of the personal computer.  Full article available on ft.com.  http://www.ft.com/cms/affdac28-1103-11db-9a72-0000779e2340.html. Also available, by [...]
Financial Times: The Educational Computer Myth, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: The Educational Computer Myth, Thomas Hazlett

Third graders in US public schools now craft writing assignments on desktop computers, cranking out reports in Word or PowerPoint. The belief is that getting kids into software early will produce happy, net savvy adults. It’s a stretch. Hardware, software, and network connections for schools cost real money, funds that could be spent on textbooks, [...]
Financial Times: Neutering the Net, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Neutering the Net, Thomas Hazlett

The legendary Vint Cerf, co-creator of the Internet Protocol (IP) standard in the 1970s, is pleading for “network neutrality.” Cerf, now Google’s chief internet evangelist, argues for government regulation to ensure that broadband subscribers can use any network application or device, without extra fees.  Full article available on ft.com. http://ww[...]
Financial Times: Google's Beautiful China Paradox, Thomas Hazlett

Financial Times: Google's Beautiful China Paradox, Thomas Hazlett

Google’s capitulation to China’s “internet-filtering technology” – in its deal to launch a China-based version of its internet search service that will actively censor results – outwardly looks like the sort of bargain a money-grubbing capitalist strikes with the devil. In some respects it is. But therein lies its paradoxical beauty.  Full article [...]