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Conference: The Digital Inventor: How Entrepreneurs Compete on Platforms

imagesonlyDigitalInventor

An Innovation and Intellectual Property Conference
George Mason University School of Law, Arlington, Va.
Friday, February 24, 2012

The assembly line of our knowledge-based economy begins with technology discovery and ends with the moving target of a consumer market.  Connectivity is funded and rewarded through exchanges of time, money, and digital goods. The conversation in this conference will identify key priorities in technology policy for innovation, network investment, and content delivery models.  Articles will be published in a special issue of the Journal of Law, Economics & Policy.

Conference Agenda:

8:30 AM  Breakfast Reception

8:45 AM  Welcoming Remarks
Daniel Polsby, Dean, George Mason University School of Law
Thomas Hazlett, Prof. of Law & Economics, George Mason University

9:00 AM  Breakfast Keynote
Design, Institutions, and the Evolution of Platforms
Richard Langlois, University of Connecticut

9:30 AM  Platforms, Modularity, and Complementary Goods
Moderator: Joshua Wright, George Mason University School of Law
Andrei Hagiu, Harvard Business School, Multi-Sided Platforms
Salil Mehra, Temple University Beasley School of Law, Platforms, Teamwork and Creativity: Mediating Hierarchs in the New Economy

10:30 AM  Industry Keynote:
Donald Rosenberg, Qualcomm, Inc., Intellectual Property and Platform Development

11:00 AM  Patent Litigation: Software Patents, Licensing, and Mobile OS Platforms
Moderator: Adam Mossoff, George Mason University School of Law
Anne Layne-Farrar, Compass-Lexecon, The Brothers Grimm Book of Business Models: A Survey of Literature and Developments in Patent Acquisition and Litigation
James Bessen, Boston University School of Law, The Private Costs of Patent Litigation

12:00 PM  Luncheon Keynote
David Teece, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley, Why “Walled Gardens” Isn’t Inconsistent with Open Innovation: Understanding How Ecosystems “Management” Promotes Progress

1:30 PM Adjourn


Speaker Biographies

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This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Digital Inventor Conference 2012

Speaker Biographies: The Digital Inventor: How Entrepreneurs Compete on Platforms

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Keynote Speakers, Panelists and Moderators for The Digital Inventor Conference, an Innovation and IP Conference, February 24, 2012:

Richard Langlois, University of Connecticut – Breakfast Keynote
Leading “Schumpeterian” economist who stresses importance of disruptive business models in explaining economic growth.  He writes on the theory of dynamic transaction costs and the theory of modular technological systems. http://langlois.uconn.edu/

David Teece, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley – Luncheon Keynote
Well-known U.C. Berkeley economist who has written about innovators’ activities to coordinate “ecosystems,” urging policy makers to understand the insufficient explanatory nature of textbook “perfect competition” or standard oligopoly models. http://facultybio.haas.berkeley.edu/faculty-list/teece-david

Donald Rosenberg, Qualcomm, Inc. – Industry Keynote
Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of Qualcomm, Inc.  Prior to joining Qualcomm, Rosenberg served as senior vice president, general counsel and corporate secretary of Apple Inc. Prior to that he was senior vice president and general counsel of IBM Corporation where he also held numerous positions including vice president and assistant general counsel for litigation and counsel to IBM’s mainframe division.

Andrei Hagiu, Harvard Business School
Associate Professor in the Strategy group at Harvard Business School who studies multi-sided markets, which feature platforms/intermediaries serving two or more distinct groups of customers, including videogames, smartphones, ecommerce, payment systems. http://drfd.hbs.edu/fit/public/facultyInfo.do?facInfo=ovr&facId=337239

Salil Mehra, Temple University Beasley School of Law
James E. Beasley Professor of Law at Temple, whose research focuses on competition and IP.  He recently published, Paradise is a Walled Garden? Trust, Antitrust and Consumer Dynamism, 18 Geo. Mason L. Rev. 889 (2011). http://www.law.temple.edu/Pages/Faculty/N_Faculty_Mehra_Main.aspx

Anne Layne-Farrar, Compass Lexecon
VP of Compass Lexecon, and an economist in antitrust and IP matters. She studies standards setting and patent value, market power, and pools.  She recently published, “Licensing Complementary Patents: ‘Patent Trolls’, Market Structure, and ‘Excessive’ Royalties”, with Klaus Schmidt, in Berkeley Tech L.J. (2010). http://www.compasslexecon.com/professionals/pages/bio.aspx?BioID=212

James Bessen, Boston University School of Law
Lecturer in Law at the Boston University School of Law and Fellow at the Berkman Center on Internet and Society at Harvard. He will present his co-authored paper with Michael Meurer on The Private Costs of Patent Litigation, http://ssrn.com/abstract=983736.  He argues that costs of litigation are much greater than legal fees, and costs are large even for lawsuits that settle. http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/jbessen

Joshua Wright, George Mason University School of Law
Antitrust economist and professor of law, in empirical law and economics, IP and law and economics of contracts.  Regular contributor to Truth on the Market, a weblog dedicated to academic commentary on law, business, and economics.
http://mason.gmu.edu/~jwrightg/

Adam Mossoff, George Mason University School of Law
Property rights scholar and professor of law, with a focus on theoretical and doctrinal intersections between property and intellectual property, with a special focus on the intellectual history of patents.
http://www.law.gmu.edu/faculty/directory/fulltime/mossoff_adam

Daniel Polsby, George Mason University School of Law
Dean and Professor of Law.
http://www.law.gmu.edu/faculty/directory/fulltime/polsby_daniel

Thomas Hazlett, George Mason University School of Law
Economist, Professor of Law, and Director of the Information Economy Project.  He recently co-authored with David Teece and Leonard Waverman, Walled Garden Rivalry: The Creation of Mobile Network Ecosystems (2011).
http://mason.gmu.edu/~thazlett/

Conference Organizer:

Sarah Oh, Information Economy Project
Operations and Research Director of the Information Economy Project at George Mason University School of Law.  She holds a J.D. from George Mason University and a B.S. from Stanford University in Management Science & Engineering. http://iep.gmu.edu/scholar/sarah-oh

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Digital Inventor Conference 2012

Video Coverage of The Digital Inventor: How Entrepreneurs Compete on Platforms

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8:45 AM  Welcoming Remarks
Daniel Polsby, Dean, George Mason University School of Law
Thomas Hazlett, Prof. of Law & Economics, George Mason University

9:00 AM  Breakfast Keynote
Design, Institutions, and the Evolution of Platforms
Richard Langlois, University of Connecticut

9:30 AM  Platforms, Modularity, and Complementary Goods
Moderator: Joshua Wright, George Mason University School of Law
Andrei Hagiu, Harvard Business School, Multi-Sided Platforms
Salil Mehra, Temple University Beasley School of Law, Platforms, Teamwork and Creativity: Mediating Hierarchs in the New Economy

10:30 AM  Industry Keynote:
Donald Rosenberg, Qualcomm, Inc., Intellectual Property and Platform Development

11:00 AM  Patent Litigation: Software Patents, Licensing, and Mobile OS Platforms
Moderator: Adam Mossoff, George Mason University School of Law
Anne Layne-Farrar, Compass-Lexecon, The Brothers Grimm Book of Business Models: A Survey of Literature and Developments in Patent Acquisition and Litigation
James Bessen, Boston University School of Law, The Private Costs of Patent Litigation

12:00 PM  Luncheon Keynote
David Teece, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley, Why “Walled Gardens” Isn’t Inconsistent with Open Innovation: Understanding How Ecosystems “Management” Promotes Progress

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Digital Inventor Conference 2012